The Metachorea, Part 2: Why the Greys?

EVOLVING UAP “OTHERS” AND EIGHT TEMPLATE ABDUCTION CASES

We’re familiar with the stereotypical grey alien. Thousands of people have reported encounters with them, in many different situations. These imps ostensibly figure in the world’s folklore as well, from the mantindane in Southern Africa, the ikuyas of Brazil, the curipiras of South America, the specific Hopi Kachinas to the Baiame of the indigenous Australians.[1] There are dozens of “experiencer memoirs” on the book market that seem to describe interactions with more or less the same creature.[2]

Beings of the grey type appeared only very sporadically in UAP landing reports (usually in spacesuits complete with helmets) from the 1950s until the early 1980s. They then became a standard element in abduction scenarios to the present day. The only types of “alien” that have held steady throughout the modern 70-year phenomena are the long blond-haired, blue-eyed “Nordic” and the “hairy dwarf.” Nordics ostensibly got their start with George Adamski (contacts between 1951-59), who claimed they were from Venus.[3]

Nordics have been reported hundreds of times, both in conjunction with UAP and without them (in “bedroom visitations,” usually preceded by a glowing haze or ball of light). You could plausibly say the Nordics resemble angels or spirit guides, and thus initially appeared to humanity as far back as the ancient Roman world. The hairy dwarf likewise figures in folklore the world over, from some types of the ancient Greek Pygmies and kobaloi/kobolds through Scandinavian trolls and huldravolk (hidden people) and medieval goblins to the Ebu Gogo of Indonesia, the Shoshone Nimerigar, and the Ojibwe’s memegwaan.

 

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With the appearance of the stereotypical greys came the accompanying reports of a heralding “blue-white light in the bedroom,” levitation of the physical body or astral body, travel thru walls/windows to a round room, sexual examinations, rape,[4] induced pregnancies, “false pregnancies,” fetal extraction, “hybrid baby presentations,”[5] and the uncovering of a lifetime of abduction experiences going back in some cases to age two. Through my research I’ve discovered that only eight cases out of hundreds (1890-1980) introduced all or most these elements before their profusion from the 1980s to the present: the Sara Shaw case (1953), the Betty Andreasson case (1967), the Shane Kurz case (1968), the Buff Ledge case (1968), the Pat Roach case (1973), the Sandra Larson case (1976), the Stanford, Kentucky case (1976), and the Allagash Four case, (1976).

I’m intentionally omitting grey abduction reports that were made under hypnotic regression or conscious recall post-1987, when Whitley Strieber’s Communion and Budd Hopkins’s Intruders were published and became top bestsellers (Communionreached #1 and remained there for months). It was through these books that alien abductions by greys entered popular consciousness in an unprecedented way. It was only after 1987 that reports of “lifelong” repeating abductions in experiencers’ lives inundated the field, going as far back as the 1950s, reported mostly under hypnosis and still featuring the greys during the time 1947-1980 when they were not reported in thousands of consciously-recalled UAP accounts that featured visible entities.

Contamination by exposure to popular culture becomes a confounding factor in evaluating the recalled elements here, so I’m trying to concentrate on early reports that contain the many standard elements of the repeating show before there was any mass knowledge of the beings’ appearance and behavior and environment.[6] Many books of experiences that were partially or fully recalled prior to 1987, such as the Allagash event or the Buff Ledge event, were investigated earlier but written up and accepted for publication after 1987 simply because of the intense interest and momentum Communion and Intruders created in the publishing industry. Alien abduction narratives became hot property between 1988-1993, perhaps peaking with the publication of C.D.B. Bryan’s book on the MIT-sponsored abduction conference (1994) and Harvard psychiatry professor John Mack’s professional interest in the subject (1993).

Many “nuts and bolts” (NaBs) advocates of UAP phenomena (those who believe biological extraterrestrials from another planet are here in physical ships) have for the most part settled upon a specific story, while seeming to willfully ignore the fact that “UFOnaut”-human interactions have radically evolved in appearance and function over the past seven decades, if not centuries. As we’ve seen in the first chapter, the NaBs explain this by saying that perhaps many ET races are here, or only a few that, like we’ve said, can project their appearance in whatever manner they want.

For the NaBs crowd, when these “experiencers” give their accounts and an expert-hypnotist fine-tunes and collates these reports they (most of the time) arrive at a convenient, simple narrative conclusion: a dying, cloned extraterrestrial race has come here across space to replenish itself by creating a hybrid race between themselves and humanity. In other words, NaBs make sense of the experiencers’ reports through the hyper-technological lens of our society. Our own fears of ecological destruction and hubristic science are reflected back to us through the cataclysmic visions that the greys often induce in experiencers during abductions,[7]along with the dissonant comfort that this same higher race may have answers for us…to immortality, to interdimensional travel, time travel, to paradise.

The story has become a repeating show, a rerun from experiencer to experiencer. Folklorist Thomas Bullard breaks down the abduction experience into 7 parts: Capture, Examination, Conference, Tour of the “ship” (rare but sporadically reported; it was first described in the Hills’s 1961 case), “Otherworldly journey” (possible but not uncommon; we will see it in the Andreasson case), Return, and Aftermath. After we examine the eight cases I will offer a list of recurring elements enumerating the details of Bullard’s sequence.

And the material revealed by experiencers and trance-mediums alike, who claim contact with “extraterrestrials” and reveal their motives, is startlingly similar in content: 1) “our vibratory rate is about to heighten in an ascension of some kind from the third density to the fourth density;” or 2) our planet will become uninhabitable, and those chosen will transcend this third density planet in some kind of ET Rapture; or 3) these alien beings are omnipresent and only need but choose to materialize anywhere, anytime; or 4) there is no good or evil, only “service to self” or “service to others”; or 5) there is a gradually-focusing spiritual orientation for human life through many incarnations on many worlds…etc.[8]

Why this particular narrative? Can’t we consider the possibility that a form of telepathy has sneakily taken place between the veteran abductee hypnotist and the experiencer/medium? Or that the dying-alien narrative has gained memetic traction in our culture, like a literal “mind virus” propagating in the dreaming night-brew of neurochemicals? That is to say, the experiencers are having night terror paralysis/visions/dreams that have been unconsciously shaped by the cultural proliferation of the grey, that are later recalled as real events?

These two popular explanations are perhaps only slightly less outlandish as that of a dying race of embryo-looking cyborgs popping into our reality to borrow our astral bodies and extract DNA from semen and ova to serve their ends…The problem is the small details these experiencers have reported, both from conscious recollection and under hypnosis. In many cases, there is a poverty of cultural contamination: too little to no prior knowledge of small details in the hundreds of abduction narratives that nevertheless appear in their fresh narratives and in new case after case.[9] These can include the particular shape of a scalpel-like instrument; the coldness of the ovoid rooms; the lack of obvious light source in those uniformly-lit rooms; the passing of the “doctor”-being’s hand over the forehead or eyes of the experiencer to stop the pain of a medical procedure; being unable to recall the transition into these rooms (“doorway amnesia”); etc.[10]

Betty and Barney Hills’s 1961 New Hampshire nighttime highway abduction is considered the first “missing time” UAP abduction but it did not contain many of the elements that would two decades later become standard—the details previously mentioned: floating into a beam of light, Out of Body Experience (OBE)-like intervals, doorway amnesia, the uniformly glowing round rooms, a “black box” wielded by the entities, a variety of beings seen together (mantis, Nordic, grey), an enhanced “psychic abilities” aftermath,[11] induced visions of apocalypse and paradise, etc.

 

          The identical elements between the Hills’s account and contemporary experiences number only eight: 1) Barney Hill consciously recalled (that is, prior to hypnosis by Dr. Benjamin Simon) feeling psychically controlled by the “leader” being’s eyes from the road as he watched the craft with binoculars; 2) the medical examination, reported by both; 3) the use of a letter-opener-type scalpel instrument to “rake hair samples” from the arm; 4) the removal of sperm from Barney by a suction-type device; 5) the insertion of a long needle into Betty’s uterus through her belly button as a “pregnancy test”; 6) the passing of the leader’s hand over her eyes/forehead to relieve the pain of the test; 7) her “conference” or tour of the vessel with the leader after the examination; 8) the general description of short beings with large, slanted eyes.[12]

The famous Pascagoula, Mississippi abduction case of October 1973 featured floating beings that carried two fishermen through the air into a landed craft.[13] Four months later in 1974 in Warneton, Belgium, a motorist whose car stopped dead in the night was confronted by two short “twin-faced” beings with inverted pear-shaped heads, large black eyes, no noses, and slits for mouths—what we now describe as greys. However, they were wearing space/pressure suits with helmets.[14]

Suits like this are very rarely reported anymore; they seem to be a relic of the 1950s-60s Space Age, when they were ubiquitous in encounters. One could trawl through the old reports and pick out each contemporary element’s appearance—elements that now all come together regularly like a show, or theater performance that has been perfected after many rehearsals.

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Here are the first eight cases that involve this entire abduction spectacle, listed in order of their public unveiling, that I’ve found. The elements of the abductions which have become commonly reported are italicized and bolded:

1. 1976: In 1975, Sandy Larson was driving with her daughter and daughter’s boyfriend near Fargo, South Dakota at about 3am when they saw an array of intense lights descend from the sky, growing closer. They stopped in mid-air less than fifty feet away from the car. A portion of the lights changed direction and disappeared off towards the horizon. At that moment the three passengers felt that time slowed down somehow as the remaining lights stopped. They abruptly found that an hour had passed. Sandy’s daughter Jackie found herself in the back seat when she’d been sitting up front with her boyfriend Terry.

 

Veteran ufologist Dr. Leo Sprinkle hypnotized Larson. She recounted that a craft had landed and told of being floated into the UAP with Terry. A bizarre robot-like being with glaring black eyes and jointed arms put her on a table, rubbed a clear, cold liquid over her skin, and inserted an instrument up her nose, then performed other medical procedures. Curiously enough, a long-existing sinus problem was cured after the experience. The face of the being’s “mummy-like” swathings could be interpreted as heavily wrinkled and folded skin. In the drawings made from her description, the being in fact facially resembles a grey, but inside a mechanical body. At one point she said the being cut open her head and removed her brain (this is a common procedure in shamanic initiations by Otherworldly spirits).[15] After a period of time she and Terry, whom she did not recall seeing inside the room, were returned to their car, and all conscious memory of the incident vanished immediately. Daughter Jackie was also hypnotized by Sprinkle and recalled only standing motionless in a field. Terry refused to be regressed.

Four months later, Sandy Larson had a night-time “bedroom visitation” of two beings. They floated her through the wall to a glowing orange craft, then transported inside a transparent cube to a building in a desert-like place. She claimed she tried to get them to understand that human minds are each different from one another, a concept they apparently couldn’t understand. The beings wanted her to “give them a report on everyone she meets” when they returned for her some day.

After this interrogation they returned her via the orange object and she recalled feeling that she needed a bath to remove the “alien germs,” which intrigued the beings. They had no understanding of soap. Having arrived at her home, Sandy then took them into the basement and showed them laundry detergent and even gave them a cup of it. At that point her memories of the night of December 4, 1975 cease.[16]

2. 1975, Utah: Mother of three Pat Roach was awakened at midnight in October 1973 by the sounds of her children screaming and the cat howling; dogs across the street were also barking. Her six year-old Debbie said a skeleton had been in the corner of their room, and that she had just visited a spaceship. Since there had been reports of a prowler in the neighborhood recently, Pat called the police, who found no sign of forced entry. After the police left, Pat’s oldest daughter Bonnie said that a “spaceman” had indeed been in the house but couldn’t recall anything further. They all had vague recollections of bright light filling the house.

When put under hypnosis in 1975, Pat recalled awakening in the bright light that night to see two small beings beside her couch. She and her children tried to fight off the creatures, who tranquillized and floated them to a craft in a nearby field. Pat was given a gynecological examination in which needles were inserted in her side. A needle was also inserted into her head, and the beings “took her thoughts.” She characterized them as clinical, unfeeling entities—which would become a standard description of the greys’ robotic, military-like demeanor. She also reported a middle-aged, apparently human male with glasses who was working alongside the creatures as if monitoring their work. This accompanying human appears in many subsequent reports (Travis Walton’s being the most famous) but most of the time a taller grey of definite gender dressed in a smock, robe, or doctor’s coat of some kind is reputed to be in charge. These taller beings additionally are reported to have a direct relationship with the experiencer over a long period of repeated encounters, as if they were a “handler” or “soul mate.”[17]

The six year-old Debbie was told she would forget the experience but replied to the creatures that she wouldn’t; she was the first to react when brought from the spell, claiming to have seen a skeleton. She also said she had seen a line of people—neighbors, some of whom she recognized—waiting to get on the “ship.”[18]

Pat Roach’s friends and family both noticed a triangular set of red marks on her arm after the incident.[19] The child Debbie Roach, whose conscious recall was the greatest, remembered a box-like suitcase had been brought into the house by the beings then removed when they returned. This “black box” figures in dozens of cases from the 1950s to the present, in many different contexts—it is used as a hypnotic device in one case, a healing device in another, a blood-sample taking device in a third, etc.

But most telling is Pat Roach’s general impression of the beings that abducted them: she claimed, “They need us.” Out of her hypnosis, she clarified that she was given knowledge that they were genetically extracting material from humans to clone them. This is clearly in line with fairy lore, as will be explored Book Two.[20]

3. 1976: On January 6, 1976, three women left a restaurant in Lancaster, Kentucky at 11:15pm for their 45-minute drive back to Liberty, Kentucky. At about 11:30, a red glowing orb soared downward from the skies ahead and materialized above the highway into a silver saucer lined with yellow lights and a brilliant dome. It swept to the left side of Route 78 and pivoted until its bottom faced them. The driver Louise Smith pulled over and tried to step out. The other two terrified women managed to stop her and continue driving (Smith never recalled this occurring). The UAP then sprayed the road with three brilliant blue-white lights and followed the car. One of the beams struck the vehicle. The backs of the women’s necks and heads terribly burned at this light. The car appeared to accelerate to 85 mph despite Smith taking her foot off the pedal; it also listed left and they had the sensation of turbulence as the car shuddered continuously. The road before them became perfectly straight, completely unlike the winding pavements of Route 78. There was a vague memory by all three women of a stone wall.[21]

Then abruptly, their surroundings returned to normal—but for the fact that the trio had headaches, irritated skin, nausea, and torpor. They made it back to Louise Smith’s trailer and were extremely thirsty. Mona Stafford’s eyelids were swollen and all their eyes were tearing continuously. They were astonished to find it was 1:25am. Smith woke her neighbors to check if the time was correct. It was. They told them their story. The husband asked them separately to draw the object. The depictions were identical.

Several days after the incident Smith found her taillights and turn signals were burned out, and her battery nearly drained; her pet parakeet was now scared of her (it died within a few months). Over the next weeks, the trio lost much weight and suffered symptoms like radiation sickness and actinic burns to their eyes. Their story made its way to investigators. All three passed polygraph examinations. When placed separately under hypnosis, the women told the same account, up to the hallucinatory straight road and wall—then they were suddenly elsewhere, and their stories diverged in the details. Mona Stafford’s first conscious memory of the missing time period was examination by a large eye; whether it was biological, as in an “alien’s” eye seen very close, or a “scanning machine” was unclear to her. Under hypnosis she recalled being in a stifling atmosphere whose ceiling reminded her of the inside of a volcano, although with further hypnotic clarity she found herself in what appeared to be a white operating room. Short beings in “surgical garb” moved beside the table on which she lay. Painful “bending” procedures were done to her legs. She felt a “wettish”, spider web-like substance coating her body and burning it.

In her hypnosis session, Louise Smith recalled her car being pulled backward and stopping at a stone wall that joined a driveway, then, apparently without transition, a pressure being exerted upon her chest as she lay upon a table. Her “examiners” telepathically exhorted her to forget their presence.

The third woman, Elaine Thomas, recalled also being within a “netted, cocoon-like device,” but this one constricted her throat when she tried to speak or emotionally protested. A bullet-like object poked her chest. She described the beings as about four feet tall, with outsized heads and dark, “turtle” eyes.

On January 6, 1976, at about 11pm, a married couple, the “T.s,” saw a light-bulb shaped, neon-like object pass south in the night sky. A Randall Floyd and his wife—and, he claimed, the “whole neighborhood”—watched a large, soundless, oval-shaped light maneuver through the skies earlier, at 8pm. Also at this time, Mike Fitzpatrick, David Irvin and Irvin’s family claimed to see a saucer with a row of orange lights.

These sightings occurred near Stanford, Kentucky, the night of the women’s experience. Investigators discovered that Fitzpatrick’s sighting was on record with the Stanford police. He had made it before the women’s story had been public.

There were “high-strange” sequels to this triple abduction: principal NICAP investigator Leonard Stringfield was concerned for the three women’s mental and physical health, and regularly checked up on them. On July 29th he called Elaine Smith, who frantically told him that she had been bidden the previous night by a voice to travel back to the stone wall, which she and Stringfield had together earlier located while retracing their path along Route 78 (at that earlier time, Smith, terrified, could not get out of the car to stand near the wall). Entranced by the voice, she dressed and did so, staring at the wall in the darkness. After an indeterminate amount of time she finally pulled herself away and drove back home and discovered that three rings on her hands were missing.

Later, Mona Stafford was visited in her house by a “biblical-looking” being with a beard and robe that simply appeared in a golden glow. Entranced like Smith, she could not pick up the telephone to call her friends or Stringfield while the event occurred.[22]

4. 1977: Betty Andreasson’s experiences are the most fantastical in the history of ufology. Five books have been written about her continuing involvement with “greys” and Nordics and other kinds of beings. Possessing an eidetic memory and being an artist, she was able to draw detailed pictures of what she re-experienced under hypnosis.

It began one foggy night in late February 1967, when the lights flickered and failed in her Massachusetts house. She, her parents, and three children saw a pink-orange glow outside the back of their home. The lights came back on. Her father went to the rear kitchen window and saw what he described in a legal affidavit as “a bunch of Halloween freaks” bouncing towards the house like grasshoppers. He retreated fearfully to the family room with the others. It was his last memory before waking up the next morning. The family consciously remembered the pulsing light, then feeling exhausted and all going to bed (or finding themselves in bed). Betty recalled that after her father went to the window she saw four greys in uniforms materialize through the back door. At this point her conscious memories ceased. While hypnotically regressed in 1976, she saw that her family seemed frozen in time from this point forward, except when her 9-year old daughter Becky (when hypnotized separately) turned her head and saw Betty and “Quazgaa” (the taller “leader” grey) holding a Bible together, and Quazgaa passing a blue book to her mother. Betty herself vaguely remembered this prior to her hypnosis. Betty was taken from the house and floated into a ship in the back yard, transported to a cavernous place, shown a unearthly garden/city, given a vision involving the classic phoenix/fire/worm-rebirth transformation, and had an encounter with the “One” which she believed was the Godhead. She could never speak of the content of this last experience and hasn’t to this day; being a fundamentalist Christian, she interpreted the entire episode in terms of angels and the fallen “Watchers” (grigori/Elohim) from Genesis who long ago bred with humans. One of the beings used a hand-held globe of light to keep her family tranquillized in the house while she was gone.[23]

5. 1979: Hans Holzer’s book “The Ufonauts” contains the second variation of the accounts of the typical UAP abduction account. In 1975, a young woman named Shane Kurz was hypnotically regressed to a 1968 missing-time episode that contained the full measure: the light filling her bedroom (which her mother and neighbors too had witnessed); walking trance-like into the night (an effect of the light) to meet with a saucer hovering over a nearby field; extraction into the saucer by a beam of light; no recall of how she immediately appeared in a round room; telepathic communication with the beings; impregnation; a later fetal extraction. She was “branded” with a triangular mark (like Pat Roach and Dr. X [see footnote], and many abductees) extending from her belly button across her lower abdomen that would spontaneously recur over the years. In its immediate aftermath she suffered deep lethargy, eye soreness, skin problems, and headaches, and her menstrual period ceased for 18 months. The details of Kurz’s experience, even more unbelievable than others in that hers involved “occult” or supernatural elements, in 20 years would come to be entirely routine “high strange” events in experiencers’ lives.

If Kurz fabricated this narrative, or her mind confabulated it while under hypnosis—and there is room for doubt here, because she had previously sighted UAPs twice with her mother and was interested in the subject, as well as being familiar with the Hill abduction case which had become public two years earlier in 1966—it does not explain why thousands of people worldwide would come to tell minor variations of her story a decade later. Advocates of the “psychosocial” explanation for abductions and debunkers both like to give “mass hysteria” as the answer—but that nebulous concept is itself scientifically unproven and has no known physical/psychological basis.[24]

6. 1980: In 1975, Sara Shaw asked investigator Ann Druffel to explore a  “missing time” event that involved a bright light and disorientation 22 years earlier, in 1953, in Los Angeles’s Tujunga Canyon. It happened to Shaw and her girlfriend Jan Whitley. Both women had no interest at all in UFOs and did not connect the experience with them, until Sara heard of the missing time phenomenon. The two women told the same story under hypnosis of a bright blue-white light waking them at 2am on March 22, 1953, the entry of short, black-clad beings into the house, being floated into a hovering, Saturn-shaped craft, and a medical examination. Jan (who Druffel believed was the focus of the abduction) fought the beings, while Sara was tranquillized and even mirthful during the episode.

Another event occurred three years later, in 1956: Jan and friend Emily Cronin pulled over at a rest stop to sleep late at night on a coastal highway. This involved memories of a bright light and men surrounding their car. When they later searched for this rest stop on the same stretch of California coastal highway, they found nothing.[25]

In 1959, Sara Shaw abruptly switched careers and eventually claimed a sort of psychic communication involving a cure for cancer and that she had a special purpose in the world. This “mission” message happens to many “silent” abductees, that is, individuals who have strange experiences but don’t connect them to abductions. Her ex-girlfriend Jan would develop cancer and pass on in 1979.

If their recollections are actual events, this would be the earliest case (1953) involving greys and a stereotypical abduction.[26]

7. 1993: Walter Webb’s exhaustive investigation in the “Encounter at Buff Ledge” is the fifth part of the template, for its story includes the (future-typical) travel to a cylindrical mothership high in space, a round room with a high, railed walkwayaround it full of glowing screens and lights, and being shown visions on a screen. This event occurred in 1968 to a pair of male and female teenagers who never again spoke to one another after it occurred, as if they were compelled not to (another common reaction by multiple abductees, whether close friends or just acquaintances)—a separation that went on for ten years after the incident.

The Buff Ledge summer camp on Lake Champlain was mostly deserted on August 7, 1968; staff and children were away on a swim meet. Lifeguard “Michael Lapp” (16) and “Janet Cornell” (19) went onto the dock and talked as the dusk set in. They had never before conversed. At one point they saw what appeared to be Venus—but then it dropped closer to the earth, elongated into a shining cylinder, and began disgorging lights. The cylinder moved up into the sky and disappeared. The three lights formed a triangle and moved closer; two of the lights raced off into the distance.

The remaining light drew closer until they could see that it was a disc-shaped object with a flattened cupola. It dove into Lake Champlain, emerged, and began to draw near. The object mesmerized the two. It came within a few dozen yards of the dock. Two entities were clearly visible in the dome staring at them. They had oversized hairless heads, large, oval black eyes, and appeared to be wearing skin-tight grey uniforms. Michael tried to ask Janet if she was seeing this but she was in an immobile trance, staring out over the lake.

Michael then initiated a telepathic conversation with one of the beings. He was so amazed and delighted that he laughed and slapped his knee—and one of the beings did the same! The other seemed to be in a trance, like Janet—or concentrating its attention upon her. Michael waved and shouted at them to come closer. The beings disappeared as the craft came slowly closer, then they reappeared.

Be careful what you wish for…

Within seconds the craft hovered over them. Michael leapt up to touch it and a very bright light engulfed them. He draped himself over Janet as the light seemed to enter his mind.

Suddenly it was nighttime, and the girls’ team was returning from their swim meet. Michael and Janet lay groggy on the dock. They wandered back to camp on the shore. Someone asked them what those bright lights were on the lake(!) but they did not answer, drifting to their respective cabins to go to sleep. They would not talk again for ten years.

After this experience, Michael would re-evaluate his life and become a religion major. Janet eventually moved to Atlanta. In 1978, Michael wrote to astronomer and UAP investigator Walter Webb of the Hayden Planetarium asking for help. Webb tracked down Janet and wrote to her, inviting her to reunite with Michael and undergo hypnotic separate regression to recall the event. He spent the next five years on the case.

The duo consciously remembered the object hovering above them then awaking to darkness. Janet’s recollection was that the object was very close over the dock and they crouched or lay down and then passed out in a bright light.

Under hypnosis, Michael found himself inside the ship with a “leader” being. They stood upon a walkway above a round room. It was impossibly larger than the saucer they had seen. The “vehicle” was in space, approaching the cylindrical “mothership.” He could see Janet upon a table, naked, being examined by the “creatures.” Samples were taken from her body. He reported computer-like lights on the wall near her. He was led down to a table next to Janet’s, laid down and passed out. When he awoke it appeared that the saucer was inside a huge space, presumably the cylinder. A light beam teleported he and the leader through the wall and into a large space full of the same “alien beings.” The leader brought him into a room, where a “helmet” was placed over his head. A group of beings were watching a film of some sort in his peripheral vision on a bubble screen and reacting to the images. 

Then the leader took him to another room, touching his hand, and Michael saw visions of a landscape with a purple sky. Many other humans surrounded him, all distraught. Janet was next to him crying. He passed out again and seemed to be falling towards an infinite number of “screens” each showing him and Janet on the dock. He entered one of them and the leader’s voice said goodbye to him.

Here it must be emphasized again that they hadn’t spoken since that night, nor had Webb revealed any of Michael’s details to Janet:

Janet, under hypnotic trance, recalled the saucer above them on the dock then immediately found herself upon a table surrounded by beings that were touching her. There were lights upon a wall. She saw Michael and the other being in the distance. She lapsed in and out of awareness. Her memories had significant gaps but she recalled being with Michael twice in rooms. She too reported that the small saucer had entered a larger one in which it sat. A mothership.

It must be stressed that Webb chose a hypnotist who had a total lack of knowledge of UAPs to boot, unlike many investigators.[27]The two told stories he determined were 70% congruent. This is an amazing case because Webb’s fieldwork showed exemplary precaution and skepticism. It contains some of the best evidence that something far from ordinary psychological states occurred to the two teenagers.[28]

8. 1993: Four art college friends went on a fishing trip deep into the remote northern Maine wilderness on August 20, 1976. On their fourth day traveling north they, along with several other witnesses, saw a glowing orange orb appear erratically over the distant woods around Chamberlain Lake. Two days later, they reached the northernmost point they could and made camp on the Allagash waterway. Late that night (under a clear and moonless sky) they built a huge bonfire onshore to orient themselves while doing some night fishing. Suddenly the same fiery object appeared, moving slowly over the trees across the lake, swirling with many colors. Chuck Rak was first to notice it, and became immobile in fascination. One of the men, Charlie Foltz, flashed a light at the silent orb, which immediately began floating towards them. It sent a bright blue light beam onto the lake surface. Terrified, they began to paddle back towards camp. The light struck their canoe and the next thing they recalled was being on shore, staring at the object in the sky as it bounced upward stepwise and shot off like a meteor. They discovered their fire, set to burn for two to three hours, was embers. It seemed 20 minutes at most had passed. Exhausted, they immediately fell asleep.

Jim and Jack Weiner, identical twins, were the first to begin having nightmares about the “missing time” between the light striking the canoe and their coming ashore. Their dreams involved non-human creatures. After hearing about the missing time-UAP phenomenon, and Jim’s reading Strieber’s Communion, they approached ufologist Raymond Fowler (chief investigator the Betty Andreasson case) in 1988. It must be stressed here that their nightmares unequivocally preceded the publication of Communion by years, and Jim Weiner was terrified by the coincidences he read therein with his own dreams—hence his contacting the famed researcher. Fowler set up hypnosis sessions for all four men. They were told individually not to divulge to the other three what they revealed during the trances. They each recalled the same basic story of being levitated by the “tunnel-like” blue light, entering a room where they were tranquillized by (insect-like) greys and each placed one by one on an examination table in which sperm samples were taken. Afterward they were floated and guided in the “tunnel-beam” by the beings, who physically helped them back into the canoe. Since they were trained artists, each drew virtually identical beings without knowledge of the others’ pictures—most incredibly, that the beings’ hands had only four digits in two pincer-like groups of two.[29]

THE EYES HAVE IT

So we have a fact, whether its content is “real” or psychosocial in nature: the encounters reported in media have changed over the decades 1950-1990 from being an outside/observer to an inside/participant.

I realize that this is a small dataset. This conjecture is culled from the dozens of books I have read over a period of years as I searched for the first unambiguous (as possible!) historical descriptions of the template abduction scenario. I claim eight cases, but of course there may be reports I’ve missed, and there may be experiences like these that simply have not been reported. For instance, a small being tried to capture a man during the 1897 American wave of “phantom airship” sightings—and claimed he experienced several hours of missing time during the chase. He was not, needless to say, hypnotically regressed to explore what befell him during his amnesiac period.[30]

I can only make these assertions based on the veracity of the experiencers’ recollections and the diligence of the original and subsequent investigators, who ruled out many mundane explanatory factors. Nor have these eight reports been proven fraudulent or decisively debunked over the intervening decades; they are in a sense canonical. A few more equally unexplained cases from the 1960s, 70s, early 1980s are available but the eight above cover the specific details that proliferated through the early 1990s experiences to the present.[31] Revisionist ufologists who have revisited these canonical cases have tried to explain them in psychosocial or psychological terms, some even invoking the involvement of intelligence agencies, but all of their interpretations have fallen short in my opinion.[32]

The point is that holistic change occurred over time—a change in the relation-triad witness/phenomena/after-effects.

By the time the alien abduction conference was held at MIT in 1993 the community had come to focus on at least two strong narratives, both based on the same material but with divergent interpretations. As arch-debunker Philip Klass once (paraphrasing) said, “given a choice between being hypnotically regressed by Leo Sprinkle or Budd Hopkins, I’d choose Sprinkle. At least then I’d have happy recovered memories.” Klass’s statement is a pithy summation of the problem that had emerged: One set of abductees, those laboring under the least ambiguous explanatory narrative for the phenomenon (Hopkins’s and historian/abduction researcher David Jacobs’s) mostly underwent the recovery of horrific experiences/memories with serious physical and psychological side effects. In total, Jacobs and Hopkins regressed perhaps over a thousand individuals. These victims had PTSD, anxiety disorders, paranoia, hypochondria, etc. Conversely, the abductees regressed by Dr. Leo Sprinkle, Dr. Richard Boylan, hypnotherapists Dolores Cannon, Barbara Lamb, John Carpenter, and Harvard psychiatry professor Dr. John Mack had minimally or manageably disturbing experiences to which they eventually learned to psychologically adjust and even incorporate into new lives that often involved healing professions, shamanistic type practices, or jobs that concerned activism against the earth’s deteriorating environmental balance. In other words they “accepted their role in the Others’s plans,” however mysterious those plans may be.

Those with professional credentials—Mack, Sprinkle, Boylan, Lamb, Cannon—tended to produce greater numbers of people finding acceptance of these experiences. Perhaps this is due to the social expectations of a clinical, therapeutic setting. Hopkins and Jacobs had neither licenses nor professional guidelines.[33]

——————-

To recap: reports of UAP entities in the 1940s, 50s, and 60s changed from “swarthy” and “Asian-looking” human beings to a wide variety of beings (hairy dwarves, small bald spacemen in pressure suits, the Nordics, elf-like creatures, etc.) to the standard “greys” which began to the best of my knowledge with the Hill, Tujunga Canyon, Kurz, Roach, Kentucky, Allagash, Larson, Buff Ledge, and Andreasson abductions in the 1960-70s. I think it’s no coincidence that mass consciousness of UAPs and their “alien pilots” exploded during the mid-to-late 1960s due to television’s domination of mass media. Science fiction UAP shows such as “The Invaders” (1967) became popular. The grey beings came to dominate the scene in the 1980s, as did what turned out to be tales of genetic extractions, impregnation, training exercises, “sick hybrid baby” nursings, and exposure to apocalyptic visions for whose aftermath the abductees were “chosen” to assist.

Here’s a list of recurring elements in these eight cases:

-Heralding very bright light

-Appearance of “greys”

-Telepathic communication (orders, mentally calming platitudes, ambiguous answers to questions)

-Floating into air with “doorway amnesia” (no recollection of entering “ship”; all cases except Andreasson’s)

-Becoming naked (or having one’s clothes removed) and being upon a table in glowing circular room with no visible light source.

-Being coated with a (usually) cold substance (Larson, Andreasson, Kentucky, Vilas-Boas [1957])

-The use of a “wand”/needle with a glowing tip (all cases but Kentucky)

-Insertion of needle in head, side, navel, neck, nostril.

-Instant tranquillization by the beings when pain occurs, usually by the passing of the “leader’s” hand over the eyes or forehead.

-Use of a black box device for tranquillization (Roach case)

-Robotic demeanor by greys.

-A taller, leader being (Hill, Buff Ledge, Larson, Allagash, Shaw, a human in the Roach case)

-Beings show the percipient a vision of a “heavenly” place on a screen (Buff Ledge, Andreasson cases; Betty Hill was shown a star map [1961]).

-Interest in the human reproductive system (extraction of eggs/sperm; all but the Kentucky case).

-Sudden return to car/house/campsite with vague or no recollection of events.

-Physical sequel—“branding” such as scars, triangular burns/rashes, nausea, headache, blurred vision, conjunctivitis, swollen eyelids, excessive sleeping or insomnia, nightmares.

Historical Phases:

ENTITIES:
Small beings and humanoids in silver suits/“diving suits”/flight suits: 1947-present

Giants, up to 11 feet tall, in silver suits/flight suits: 1952-present.

“Dark-complected” or “Mediterranean-looking” humans: 1947-1985

“Asians”: 1947-1970 (1896-1970 if the airship landings of 1896 are included)

“Nordics”: 1947-present (or antiquity to present, on a cultural assessment)

Imps or dwarves: 1950-present (or antiquity to present)

Reptilian creatures: 1950-present (or antiquity to present)

Presence of hairy bodies, including face: antiquity-present

Greys (in order of their media reporting): 1967-present (Or 1961-present including the Hill case, or 1953-present in Shaw case [1990])

Mantises/mantids: 1990-present

OBSERVED BEHAVIOR:

1951-present: Hybrid human/almost indistinguishable from human being, bearing “message for all humankind”, with or without presence of object.

1952-1985: Instruments used by entities seen at a distance such as “metal detectors” being waved across ground; silver wands (1954-present); a box on chest or belt that when touched induces paralysis in observer (1953-present).

1950-1985: Observation of surveying/collecting of flora/mineral samples.

1967-present: entities holding a small globe of light which effects paralysis (Andreasson); in her later recollections of earlier abductions, she witnessed a tiny marble of light from the entities that flew and attached itself between the eyes on the forehead.

WAVES OF ACTIVITY:
–The first wave was simply the “object” seen in flight (antiquity-present)

–The second wave was the “object” seen in flight or hovering, with a subsequent ray of light that paralyzes the observer

–The third wave was of landed “objects” with the entity either “surprised” by witness and followed by a quick takeoff; sometimes the startled “pilots” paralyzed the percipient (1947-present, possibly far earlier—this is consistent with the “fairy-stroke”/“elf-shot” of fairies) then entered the UAP and took off, or they intentionally approached the witness (with or without paralysis), then takeoff. Many times it appeared as if the beings were either collecting flora or repairing their “craft.” (1949-1981).

–Fourth and overlapping with 3 is automobile disturbance either before or during sighting of “craft” (1950-present; many Otherworldly encounters during the pre-automobile era reported disturbed horses that often would stop and go no further in the presence of beings/lights).

–Fifth is observed landing or already landed craft seen, paralysis, and abduction (Vilas-Boas and Hill, 1957-present, reported 1957 & 1961, mass media presentation for both encounters in 1966). Albert Rosales’s humanoid encounter catalog contains scattered reports in the early 1950s in — of consciously-recalled abductions without greys that also had reproductive operations.

–Sixth is the appearance of a strong light in the house, paralysis, and abduction to a circular room involving the standard elements (Shaw, 1953, Andreasson, 1968-present).

—————

Adherents to the nuts-and-bolts UAP conjecture would explain the large variety of entities reported prior to the greys’ prevalence by saying that many alien races are here, or perhaps the aliens’ appearances have been deceptive in the past but they are now finally showing us their true form and purpose through the Nordics’ and greys’ seeming ubiquity in these encounters.

Indulging this for a moment: if they deceived percipients before, for whatever reason, then why should we believe this is their true form?

It is more likely the greys and the Nordics are the “model” millions of people have (un)consciously chosen to accept. For several reasons:

They are basically human looking. Collectively, abduction experiencers certainly haven’t settled upon hairy, grunting ugly dwarves as their primary antagonists (these figure in early 1950s-1990s, especially South American, UAP reports—although many experiencers, including Whitley Strieber, have encounter cloaked, dark blue-skinned “dwarves” during their episodes).

This “choice” of the greys’ physical appearance and purposes is in line with ingrained cultural expectations. Consider the Talosians from the original 1964 Star Trek pilot, “The Cage”: they were short, skinny, pale, huge-headed, bald, tiny nosed, with hardly a mouth. If we gave them large slanted ebony eyes, they would look almost exactly like greys. The Talosians possessed stupendous powers for casting holographic illusions on humans, and are involved in a desperate search for genetic “stock” to rebuild their civilization, which their ancestors destroyed. Sound familiar?

Here is H.G. Wells’s extrapolation of what humans would look like given a million years’ evolution:

 

Here are huge heads, large eyes, skeletal bodies. Thanks to Wells, dozens of visual depictions in syfy art, from the 1890s onward depicted skinny, simioid beings with large craniums and large eyes. Folklorist Thomas Bullard, Martin Kottmeyer, and Robert Sheaffer have each undertaken an extensive cataloging of ostensible “contamination” of UAP entity descriptions by science fiction monsters and motifs, particularly the spate of 1950s alien invasion films and 1960s-70s TV shows and films. Their work showed only ambiguous (statistically insignificant) correlations between extraterrestrial depictions, in everything from pulp magazines to TV shows and the subsequently reported “real aliens.” But correlation is not causation, of course, and the attempt to explain a mechanism of action for how people would experience these Others via entertainment sources goes, for the debunkers, no further than “cryptomnesia of the media source combined with hallucination brought on by unconscious stress hysteria, or dream/self-hypnosis mis-experienced or misremembered as reality.” Whoof! It is a game try, and may explain a portion of cases, but ultimately untenable explanation for the experiences in which multiple witnesses and physical evidence is present. And it does not explain the prevalence of the greys in reports.

Experiencers report beings that resemble human fetuses—basically large heads with vestigial bodies. Consider the image metaphorically: The head dominates: the intellect dominates. The body is negligible. And what results from a race in which the head outweighs the heart? Unfeeling, cold beings who treat humans like lab rats.

 

As noted above, the grey has precedent in UAP reports but at one time they had visible irises and pupils, and not the black, shiny eyes. The Hills and Betty Andreasson reported large, visible black irises on the entities they met. This to me signifies another subconscious projective clue: the eyes being the “window to the soul,” and such emotionally expressive organs, the greys now have no eyes, thus have no souls. These organs that communicate so much between humans is a void. With researchers Budd Hopkins, Whitley Strieber, David Jacobs, Raymond Fowler, Edith Fiore, John Carpenter, Yvonne Smith, and John Mack came mass experiencer reports of these black eyes.[34]

Many other types of “high strange” beings have in fact been encountered since 1980, but the reports seem to have been swept under the rug over the past 30 years, ever since the greys appeared in the popular literature. They are outliers and not taken seriously, thus no longer widely reported. That is to say, a consensus set in on the aliens’ appearance, and many ufologists became just as narrow-minded as the debunkers (as noted already, one great exception to this is researcher Albert S. Rosales, who has published fourteen books on these outlier creatures that appear in conjunction with UAP sightings).[35]

When one examines the most elaborate ongoing abduction cases—Betty Andreasson Luca’s (1967-95) and Whitley Strieber’s (1985-97) for instance—you find the themes that hundreds of other experiencers echo: messages of ecological destruction, impending human sterility, the spiritual poverty of Western worldview, the need for redemption, a “purification” of the planet, the beings as evolutionary principles connected with the dead, as guides and “Watchers,” as guardian angels. These match with religious visionaries’ experiences throughout history. Sneaking beneath this current discourse is undoubtedly the deep-time symbolisms that world mythology presents. Transitional periods of great societal upheaval and psychological transformation should produce, by Carl Jung’s theory of the collective unconscious, a certain stereotyped response by the mind—and this seems to be the case here. The greys may be symbols of our future, creatures embodying a liminal state between the atavistic and the high-technological.

Abductees are kept in constant state of confusion and disorientation during their experiences. Nothing is clearly or directly perceived. As we can see, stereotyped imagery is prevalent: the round dimly lit room, the operating table, a wall of lights/computers, scanners, etc. Rote orders, exhortations to relax, and cosmic platitudes are offered by the Others during the terrifying encounters. The aliens speak of disaster and rebirth of their race and the creation of a human-hybrid one on a world that may or may not be the earth. They claim that the human race is repeating their past mistakes, and they show experiencers images of what is taken to be their now-barren world.[36] Very often their ships contain plant nurseries. For instance, after passing through a verdant, hothouse-type landscape, Betty Andreasson was shown an unaltered, straightforward Phoenix rebirth “performance” that deeply affected her. This amounts to psychodrama. The Others act as doctors, performing check-ups and operations on humans, thus are acting like our “keepers”—and contactees/experiencers claim they’re our siblings or even parents. As noted above, experiencers are often “washed” or cleaned with cold gels and liquids, like a baptism, before medical procedures or “transportation” scenarios where they visit the aliens’ home world. They are also at times immersed in pools of vibratory liquids under which they find they can breathe.[37]

The alien fetuses removed (by light or “physically”) from female experiencers’ wombs are usually immediately transferred into a liquid-filled container.[38] Experiencers male and female almost very often report seeing nurseries with walls filled with these tanks.[39]

I’m not saying something very strange is not happening, or that some intelligence is not interacting with us. I’m saying they take the form we partially project onto them. We are co-creating their form through some presently unknown psychophysical means, which we shall explore. Another way to say this is that there is a third element between the tired mind/body duality. This third is an interface with “outer” reality, and is the primary means of perception—not the sensory apparatus of a physical body or brain. What I call the metachoria is the field in which all unwilled mental phenomena occur, but metachores (unconscious/subliminal templates or images) per se have the character or aspect of “transmissions” from elsewhere or elsewhen for those who experience them. These may come unbidden from things such as a sudden image for a painting in an artist all the way to a full-blown abduction experience. It is a matter of degree of the state of attunement to the metachoria. This is my nexus between a certain kindof mind of the UAP/paranormal experiencer, which I will later discuss more clearly in parts four and five of this essay. The rest of this work will address physical (re)actions by which these phenomena manifest in “our” world. The particular psychophysical histories of the experiencers, while in many cases showing similarities such as psychic abilities or “fantasy proneness” or dissociative tendencies,[40] will play a large part in my description but is not determinative. That there is something on the “other side” of perceptible reality that is utilizing electromagnetic phenomena and persons highly sensitive to electromagnetic fields is implied but I submit we can know only a small set of axioms regarding these forms’ motives or true nature. It is only by their statistical rarity and the effects they sometimes catalyze in witnesses that they are called “supernatural.” I believe they are of natural origin—albeit “agents” of a biological superorganism of which our consciousness observes only a narrow phenomenological range of activity.[41]

The next part will outline an interpretation of the physics of consciousness with regard to willed vs. unwilled thoughts and actions and the place the quantum Zeno effect (QZE) within the brain’s neurons has in this apparent dichotomy; we will discover that there is something missing in this formulation that only conjecturing a third field would accommodate. The chapter will also address the concept of quantum entanglement, feedback loops between “mind” and “matter,” the Fourier transform/frequency domain model of the bodily senses, and the holographic universe conjecture.

 


[1] The indigenous Australians of the Arnem Land have the Mimi, who are the forefathers who taught many skills to the Yolngu and Bininj clans in antiquity. They are described as extremely frail and thin, and could be contacted by approaching sacred stones or mountains in ritual manner. These places were doorways to an immaterial dimension that, like the fairy and djinn planes, existed outside of the human world. Mimi play tricks on humans if they or their magic places are not respected. Shamans could fully interact with the beings. Their offices derive from the cult-heroes of the totemic heroes, spirits and ghosts and second the long line and hierarchy or order of medicine men, which leads back to the same heroes of the Dreamtime. They were thought to steal food, fool unsuspecting travellers, and even shoot magic darts—which is a connection to many shamanistic practices and the “fairy elf-shot.” The magical arrow is also associated with Abaris the Hyperborean, a figure said to have emerged from a mythical land “beyond the north wind”. Abaris was said to be able to commune with spirits, heal the sick and travel through the air on a magic arrow. Additional connections to Apollo and Pythagoras hint at the shamanistic journeying technique of “incubation” practiced by the healer Asclepius in his temple.

[2] And then there is the existence of ancient cave paintings in Australia, India, the American Southwest which depict beings very similar to the descriptions of the greys: large, bald, pale heads and staring ovoid black eyes with stick-like or vestigial bodies. Anthropologist Michael Narby in his book The Cosmic Serpent and Graham Hancock in Supernatural speculate that these strange beings were encountered during shamanistic trances so regularly that they merited artistic representation on cave and rock paintings. This conjecture will play a crucial part of my thesis as to UAP “creatures’” genesis and purpose.

[3] Clark, Jerome. The UFO Encyclopedia: The Phenomenon from the Beginning, 2 Vols., Omnigraphics Inc., 1998, pgs. 26-37. Adamski is widely regarded as a charlatan (at worst) or someone who confabulated and capitalized on a real experience with UAP (at best). We would consider ludicrous his claims about the Venusians’s civilization—from a literal point of view. But do the Nordics’ independent longevity in UAP reports 1) grant some kind of credence to Adamski’s outlandish stories, or 2) bump down the believability factor of Other experiencers’ tales or 3), suggest some sort of psychological “screen” is being induced on all the witnesses’ minds, and the actual energies/intelligence behind the images are beyond our comprehension, as one of our ET hypothesis conjectures in the preface allowed for? And if the third option is so, why do these hidden intelligences choose robed/jumpsuited, blue-eyed, blond seven-foot “Aryans” and not a beautiful Ethiopian princess, even occasionally? Perhaps the hidden intelligences don’t do the choosing. Perhaps we do, because the “Nordic” and dwarf images are very ancient and have always signified the Otherworld (of which more later).

[4] Jacobs, David M., The Threat: Revealing the Secret Alien Agenda, Simon and Schuster, 1999, pgs. 76-88; Clark, The UFO Encyclopedia: The Phenomenon from the Beginning, pgs. 4-15;

[5] Pritchard, Andrea; Pritchard, David E.; Mack, John E.; Kasey, Pam; Yapp, Claudia, eds. Alien Discussions: Proceedings of the Abduction Study Conference held at MIT, Cambridge, MA.,1995, pgs. 45-81; Jacobs, David M. Secret Life: Firsthand, Documented Accounts of UFO Abductions, Touchstone, 1993, pgs. 49-60, 91-93, 107-131, 153-186, 209-219; Jacobs, David M., The Threat, pgs. 116-118, 128-160; Clark, The UFO Encyclopedia: The Phenomenon from the Beginning, pgs. 7-9, 15-17;

[6] There have long been battles over the veracity of memories recovered under hypnosis. Rarely are they accepted in court, especially after many of the allegations during the “Satanic panic” of the 1980s-early 90s were proven to be hoaxes or confabulations. Studies have shown that in general, emotionally disturbed individuals and their health practitioners both are primed to play out a specific dynamic during a clinical setting. The patient is primed to provide material acceptable or amenable to the therapist’s skills. The same dynamic holds between an abductee and a qualified hypnotherapist or an “abduction expert” who practices hypnosis without a license. The theory goes that the abductee unconsciously (or consciously) wants to please the researcher with an account that conforms to the template; in this way, both participants are recognized as valid and “special.” When an abductee deals with someone of David Jacobs’s or Budd Hopkins’s stature, who are known world-wide as “abduction experts,” the unconscious is even more emotionally engaged and the imagination active. Thus we can say, with a high degree of probability, that there will be a level of confabulation present in abduction narratives made while under hypnosis by an abduction expert, whether licensed or not. To what level that confabulation rises has supposedly been neutralized by researchers withholding outlying, unusual details over time in their published works, to see if these “odder-than-normal” details turn up in further cases. Although this is meant to be a scientific method to determine the veracity of a case as a “control,” the approach is flawed; it is the abductee’s prior knowledge of any narrative structure or sensory details to these experiences that should always be the issue. To put it another way, if a family of homesteaders living off the grid for several generations were to suddenly show up terrified at the local police station with conscious, template-level tales of abduction, their lifestyle would count in favor of the truthfulness of their claims. If Amish families, say, with none to minimal familiarity with aliens or abductions were to claim the full-spectrum conscious experiences we are detailing, what could we say about it? The Amish would probably claim they encountered demonic forces. But if they reported classic grey beings, we would have to concede that, at least, the image of the grey has risen above the level of a “cultural contaminant” and gained some sort of independent psychological existence.

[7] See Strieber, Whitley. Communion: A True Story, Avon Books, 1987, pgs. 52-64; Jacobs, David M., The Threat: Revealing the Secret Alien Agenda, Simon and Schuster, 1999, pgs. 227-234; Bullard, Thomas E., The Myth and Mystery of UFOs, The University Press of Kansas, 2010, pgs. 89, 140, 179, 218, 230; Clark (1998), pgs. 7, 8, 17; Randles, Jenny. Abduction, pg. 136; .

 

[8] See Rueckert, Carla and Elkins, Don. The Law of One: Ra Material, L/L Research, 1982; Anka, Darryl, Bashar: Blueprint for Change: A Message from our Future, New Solutions Publishing, 1990; Cannon, Dolores, The Convoluted Universe Series 1-5, Ozark Mountain Publishing, 2001-2015; Marciniak, Barbara, The Bringers of the Dawn: Teachings from the Pleiadians, Bear & Company 1992. The list could encompass dozens, perhaps over a hundred, books.

[9] Bullard (2010), pg. 299; Clark (1998), pgs. 13, 21, 23;

[10] Bullard (2010), pgs. 71, 138-39, 142; Bryan, C.D.B. Close Encounters of the Fourth Kind: A Reporter’s Notebook on Alien Abduction, UFOs, and the Conference at MIT, Penguin Books, 1996, pgs. 27, 261, 418; Clark (1998), pgs. 6-14.

[11] See Randles, Jenny. Abduction, Guild Books, 1988, pgs. 67, 69, 91; Clark (1998), pgs. 9, 10, 16, 705-07; Bullard (2010) pgs. 143-44.

 

[12] Full account: Fuller, John G. The Interrupted Journey: Two Lost Hours “Aboard a Flying Saucer,” New York Press, 1966. Four years prior to the Hills’s missing time experience, in 1957, Brazilian farmer Antonio Vilas Boas was plowing his field in the middle of the night (due to the daytime heat) when he was dragged aboard a teardrop-shaped craft by four beings in spacesuits. He was stripped naked and examined. He was then led into a room where he had intense sex with a pale, tiny, growling woman with blue, slanted, cat-like eyes. Just before the woman’s appearance, the “astronauts” had applied a gel to his skin with sponges and a type of smoke had been ejected into the room that made him nauseous; he claimed uncontrollable passion towards the woman and later speculated that either the smoke or the gel was a powerful aphrodisiac. He remembered the entire experience without hypnosis. Boas’s description of the woman’s face and her platinum-blond hair are very similar to both the female Nordics (although she wasn’t seven feet tall) and “hybrid human” greys. This case was investigated in Brazil within four months of its occurrence, but unknown to investigators in the USA until 1966, after the Hills’s case had its spectacular unveiling via the Saturday Evening Post. So the theme of reproduction-intervention was present in these two earliest reports. See Coral and Jim Lorenzen, Encounters with UFO Occupants, Berkley Publishing Corporation, 1976, pgs. 61-87, for the full account.

[13] Ibid, pg. 215; Blum, Ralph and Blum, Judy. Beyond Earth: Man’s Contact with UFOs, Bantam Book,s 1974, pgs. 12-36.

[14] Lorenzen, pgs. 342-346.

[15] A similar “physical” procedure of “cranial brain removal” has occurred in other UAP abductions. See Fiore, Edith. Encounters: A Psychologist Reveals Case Studies of Abductions by Extraterrestrials, Doubleday, 1989, pg. 139; Rosales, Albert S. Humanoid Encounters: 1985-1989, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2015, pg. 289.

 

[16] Full account: Lorenzen, Coral and Jim, Abducted! Confrontations with Beings from Outer Space, Berkley Publishing, 1977, pgs. 52-69; Clark (1998) pgs. 573-76.

[17] Often their heads are described as resembling a praying mantis, and the experiencer often senses that this being is possibly millions of years old and infinitely wise.

[18] This detail would also come to be repeated many times throughout the 1980s and 90s: rooms full of people known and unknown are seen by the abductee aboard the craft or a cavern of some sort by the experiencers. Many times these hordes are sedated upon tables, or seen naked in groups in a groggy state. In a few instances, two repeat experiencers had abductions in which they remembered seeing each other during encounters that were later discovered to have occurred on the same night. See

[19] While this may or may not be related to her experience that night, this detail nevertheless recalls the 1968 case of “Dr. X” in France. Preeminent UFO expert Aime Michel interviewed Dr. X several days after his experience occurred. (“X” was pseudonymously used because he was a well-known town physician at the time, and all the examiners vouched for the man’s sincerity in the face of his incredible tale). A few days before the incident, X had injured his foot with an axe. He additionally suffered from a permanent limp due to a wound inflicted while serving in the Algerian war. He was awoken by his infant son’s cries late that night. Entering the room, his son was gesturing at the window, where a light pulsed. Several hundred yards away, two massive lights were strobing above the woods. They joined then “exploded” in a lightning-like flash. Both his war wound and the ax wound were instantly healed. Even stranger, a triangular red rash appeared around his navel—and one appeared around his infant son’s navel as well. They faded over several weeks but would periodically return on both of father and son (once, purportedly, they broke out simultaneously when the two were far apart from each other). See Clark, Jerome. The UFO Encyclopedia: The Phenomenon from the Beginning, 2 Vols., Omnigraphics Inc., 1998, Vol. 1, pgs. 335-337; Vallee, Jacques, Dimensions: A Casebook of Alien Contact, Anomalist Books, 2008, pgs. 173-176.

[20] Full account: Lorenzen, Coral and Jim, Abducted! Confrontations with Beings from Outer Space, Berkley Publishing, 1977, pgs. 9-24; Clark (1998) pgs. 800-802.

[21] These effects on the car and the perception of a “changed road” have occurred in a few abduction cases. See the Australian case of Maureen Puddy, which occurred between July 1972 and February 1973, cited in Bryan, C.D.B., Close Encounters of the Fourth Kind: A Reporter’s Notebook on Alien Abduction, UFOs, and the Conference at MIT, Penguin Books, 1996, pgs. 70-74.

[22] Full account: Stringfield, Leonard. Situation Red: The UFO Siege, Fawcett, 1978; Clark (1998), pgs. 554-58; Lorenzen, Coral and Jim, Abducted! Confrontations with Beings from Outer Space, pgs. 114-131.

[23] Full account: The Andreasson Affair: The Documented Investigation into a Woman’s Abduction aboard a UFO, Prentice Hall, 1980; Clark (1998), pgs. 86-95.

[24] Full account: Holzer, Hans. The UFOnauts: New Facts on Extraterrestrial Landings, Fawcett Gold Medal Books, 1976.

[25] This is quite a common phenomena as well in the minutes leading up to encounters: brilliantly lit rest stops, houses, diners, gas/convenience stores, or construction sites are observed that, when later searched for along the same route, are found not to have existed.

[26] Full account: Druffel, Ann and Rogo, D. Scott, The Tujunga Canyon Contacts, Anomalist Books, 2008. However, more cases have come to light involving greys that occurred in the 1950s, culled from regressive hypnosis sessions in the late 1980s-present. See Yvonne Smith’s Chosen: Recollections of UFO Abductions through Hypnotherapy; Dr. John Mack’s Abduction: Human Encounters with Aliens and Passport to the Cosmos, and Intrusion by Bob Mitchell.

[27] If this were done as a rule by investigators with those claiming abduction, perhaps the “psi-contamination” explanation for the startling uniformity of details could be ruled out.

[28] Full account: Webb, Walter N. Encounter at Buff Ledge: A UFO Case History, J. Allen Hynek Center, 1993; Clark (1998), pgs. 169-172.

[29] Fowler, Raymond, The Allagash Abductions, Granite Publishing, 1993.

[30] See The Great Airship Mystery: A UFO of the 1890s by Daniel Cohen, pgs.

[31] For instance, in 1975, Air Force Sgt. Charles Moody went out to watch a meteor display at 1AM and saw a UAP drop from the sky and hover very close to his car. Returning home after a period of confusion, he found several hours of missing time had passed when he was sure his trip should have taken no more than forty minutes. He experienced intense pain in his lower back the next day, and developed a “heat rash” on his lower body. These physical reactions might indicate an allergic reaction to enormous EM exposure. He had no memory of abduction until spontaneously recalling it weeks later. He consciously recalled the UAP landing, and later fully recalled the abduction involving greys in which he injured two of the beings before being taken into the “ship.” Their leader showed him the propulsion mechanism during a tour of the vehicle before releasing him. It must be stressed that there were no images or descriptions of “grey” beings, the “tour,” the rooms’ uniform lighting without a source, the missing time phenomenon, crystalline “engine” parts, etc., that Moody described that were known to the public at the time except for the 1961 Hill case (see Lorenzen, Coral and Jim, Abducted! (1977) pgs. 38-52 for the full account). The elements listed above would all become parts of the standard narrative in the 1980s and 1990s. According to Albert Rosales’s humanoid encounters catalogue, creatures similar or identical to greys in conjunction with UAP were reported in Bethel, North Carolina, 1920; Port Burwell, Canada, 1925; Poitiers, France, 1928 a man saw a light land and was taken into a strange area with grey-like creatures and covered in a cold gel that evaporated, and he was able to pass through the space’s walls (we will see that these are two fairly consistent details in today’s abductions); Floridablanca, Colombia in 1950; Safonova, USSR in 1951; West Surrey, England, in 1956; La Napoule, Alpes Maritimes, France in 1956; and Novato, California in 1958; Sedalia, Missouri, in August 1965; Island Lake, Manitoba, fall 1966; Mendoza, Argentina in September, 1968. UAP-associated “reptilian” beings were reported in Nuevalos, Spain in 1954; Riverside, California in November 1958; Vienna, North Carolina in June 1963. “Doorway amnesia” was reported in an abduction encounter involving non-grey creatures at St. Francis River, Arkansas in 1954 when a 7-year old boy was allegedly hit with an intense light and found himself upon a table surrounded by beings; in March 1959 a Japanese businessman allegedly saw a spherical UAP approaching and suddenly found himself aboard the “craft.”  A case involving an entity touching a percipient’s forehead to induce tranquilization is reported to have occurred in Cordoba, Argentina in 1957. I must stress that these were all consciously recalled encounters in which hypnotic regression was not used. I have deliberately avoided the 1975 Travis Waltoncase for reasons of continuing controversy over his polygraph tests and the tangle of claims and counterclaims involving character that noised his story from the beginning—although the debunkers have never convincingly discredited his and his six co-workers’ tale of the UAP and Walton’s being struck by a beam from it.

[32] In the book The Abduction Enigma for instance, author Kevin Randle, the primary APRO investigator of the Pat Roach case, eventually dismissed it as the product of confabulation, contamination and “leading questions” by hypnotist Dr. James Harder. The regression transcript evidence Randle produces in the book is weak: just a few questions Harder asked that Roach answered in the affirmative and proceeded to elaborate on. In hypnosis, there are literally thousands of questions a hypnotist could ask that are knowingly meant to lead the experiencer during sessions that are just as often answered “no” and corrected by the hypnotic subject. Randle simply puts down Roach and her children’s experience to the fact that there were rumors of a prowler at the time in her neighborhood. Apparently he means they had a hysterically-shared fantasy. No scientific explanation is offered how such a thing could occur; it fails to explain both children’s conscious recollections of a “skeleton spaceman” in the house, Roach’s disorientation and unexplained terror that night, her memory of a bright light, and the marks on her body…On the Allagash case, he dismisses Jim Weiner’s first hypnotic accounts as contaminated simply because he read Strieber’s book Communion, which contained many parallels to nightmares he had already been having for years and is in fact what caused him to seek investigator Raymond Fowler’s help in the first place (and Randle doesn’t begin to explain how such an odd coincidence such as this would be possible). He ignores the other three Allagash men’s hypnotic accounts of their missing time, which are very similar to identical to Jim’s. Randle claims that their speaking together about the strange incident in the 12-year interim caused “contamination”—which says nothing as to how they could come up with similar to identical accounts of the “repressed” experience, unless one allows for telepathy. Investigator Fowler made certain after Jim Weiner’s first sessions that Jim reveal nothing of what they had uncovered to the other three, who had not read Communion. Additionally, Randle sloppily summarizes the events leading up to the four men’s return to their camp after the conscious UAP encounter, when they found their huge bonfire reduced to embers. Obviously a period of hours had elapsed between their leaving and returning, when they were certain the whole episode had taken 30 minutes at most. He fails to mention the classic interplay between a UAP and a human light source, in this case Charlie Foltz turning the flashlight at the thing and “signaling” at it, which caused to object to send a beam down and approach them. Again, these events were all conscious recollections of the four men prior to their hypnosis…Randle also summarily dismisses the Shane Kurz abduction as unreal simply because paranormal researcher Hans Holzer did the hypnotic regression on her…The Abduction Enigma does not touch upon our other five template cases. Randle and his co-authors selectively choose cases where contamination by accounts of the Hills’s, Vilas-Boas’s, and Strieber’s encounters is in fact possible. This is a valid qualification, but again, it does not explain the core uniformly, consciously recalled experiences. These Randle explains away in the Roach case as fantasy generated unconsciously by the media-ubiquitous UFO reports of late 1973. The book also conveniently mentions only in passing the thoroughly researched multiple-witness accounts we have been looking at, such as the Andreasson case, the Buff Ledge case, and the Stanford, Kentucky case.

 

[33] Go into BUFORA, ethics.

[34] Which according to Betty Andreasson Luca are conjectured to be contact lenses with holographic projective/memory and neurologically extractive properties.

[35] While the greys’ physical appearance got made into Halloween costumes and bumper stickers and appeared in Hollywood movies, the damned within the damned march on. Rosales has spent over 40 years collecting humanoid reports that in most ways do not conform to this “mainstream” midnight theater show that keeps both MUFON and Pleiadian cults going. His (currently) 14 volumes of worldwide humanoid reports 1AD-2015 show that the parade of high-strange beings has never ended. Hypnotic recall of the encounters is rare in the reports he has documented; the percipients were either fully conscious or under the Oz Factor while experiencing the Others but required no therapist to elicit their memories. This alone makes them (ironically perhaps) less suspect than the ongoing parade of “grey manipulations.” Rosales’s reports are the raw accounts from field ufologists and cryptozoologists across the world and show that hairy dwarves, little green bearded men, Sasquatches, reed-thin “elves,” uniformed giants, living stick figures, smoky apparitions, sentient, human-shaped fogs, white “Michelin tire men,” winged furry “demons,” space-suited elves, fairies, and indescribable Bosch-like beings have not disappeared from human experience.

[36] Clark (1998), pgs. 7, 9, 15; Randles, (1988), pgs. 175-76. The list of these attributes from Hopkins’s and Jacobs’s books would be very long. They figure in most of their cases.

 

[37] Fowler, Raymond, The Andreasson Affair, pgs. 59-65, 101-103; Bryan, pg. 21, 414; Turner, Karla, Taken, pg. 73, 107, 139; Smith, Yvonne, Chosen, Backstage Entertainment, 2008, pgs. 54-64, 79-81; Clear, Constance, Reaching for Reality, Consciousness Now Inc., 1998, pgs. 142-144; Fiore, Edith, Encounters, Doubleday, 1989, pg. 19; Mack, Abduction, pg. 34-35, 125; Rosales, Albert S., Humanoid Encounters: 1900-1929, pg. 129; Jacobs, David M., The Threat, pgs. 100-101; Randles, Jenny, Abduction, pg. 91;

Hopkins,

[38] Fowler, Raymond, The Watchers, Bantam Books, 1990, pgs. 19-34; Clear, pg. 144; Smith, pgs. 80-81; Mack, John, Passport to the Cosmos: Human Transformation and Alien Encounters, Three Rivers Press, 2000, pgs. 121-127.

[39] Mack, Abduction, pg. 155; Turner, pg. 154; Clark, Jerome, ed. The UFO Encyclopedia: The Phenomenon from the Beginning, 2 Vols., Omnigraphics Inc., 1998, Vol. 1, pg. 7; Jacobs, The Threat, pgs. 62-69, 100-101.

[40] Bryan, pgs. 126-127; Kelly, Edward, and Kelly, Emily Williams. Irreducible Mind: Toward a Psychology for the 21st Century, Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, 2009, pgs. 337-340, 345-348.

[41] This may sound like pantheism or panpsychism, because it is.

 

“UFOnauts” used to come in all flavors: space-suited dwarves, hairy gremlins, robed monks, silvery giants, glowing balls and humanoids, tall blond “Nordics,” “Asians,” “Mediterraneans”–then suddenly in the mid-1980s witnesses started mostly reporting the skinny lightbulb-headed cyborgs called the greys. What the hell happened? Here I look into the history of the alien abduction, examine the history of its elements, and possibly why the grey bastards monopolized a perfectly entertaining form of theater with their supposed genetic machinations.

“Alien abduction” as Shamanic Initiation: The History of a Mystery

Angelcave

Transverberation: The soul being inflamed with the love of God which is interiorly attacked by a Seraph, who pierces it through with a fiery dart. This leaves the soul wounded, which causes it to suffer from the overflowing of divine love.

–St. John of the Cross

“While I was hearing the boys’ confessions on the evening of the 5th [August] I was suddenly terrorized by the sight of a celestial person who presented himself to my mind’s eye. He had in his hand a sort of weapon like a very long sharp-pointed steel blade which seemed to emit fire. At the very instant that I saw all this, I saw that person hurl the weapon into my soul with all his might. I cried out with difficulty and felt I was dying. I asked the boy to leave because I felt ill and no longer had the strength to continue. This agony lasted uninterruptedly until the morning of the 7th. I cannot tell you how much I suffered during this period of anguish. Even my entrails were torn and ruptured by the weapon, and nothing was spared. From that day on I have been mortally wounded. I feel in the depths of my soul a wound that is always open and which causes me continual agony.”

— Letter from St. Padre Pio to Padre Benedetto, Aug. 21, 1918.

————–

“The spirits cook (the shaman’s) flesh to ripen it.”[1]

—————

The “angel” Quazgaa to Betty Andreasson, 1967:

“We prefer our food burnt…by food we mean knowledge, knowledge tried by fire.”[2]

 

HISTORY OF CITATIONS

As the second epigraph indicates, motifs of a celestial or infernal being injuring a “chosen” person that induces ecstatic agonies is not confined to the beliefs of traditional shamanic cultures. Padre Pio (1887-1967) was a Capuchin monk who went on to possess powers of healing, bilocation, levitation, and stigmata. These feats were verified and documented by the stringent Catholic authorities as authentic and he was canonized.

Had he been born in an Amazonian village, the elder shamans would surely have ordained him a powerful curandero.

One current in alien abduction literature links the experiences of the abductees with that of shamanic initiation. No such reverse paralleling—from academic shamanism studies to the abduction experience—has to my knowledge been explicitly made, except for a very short article by UCLA professor Douglass Price-Williams in 1999. Such a connection could only have been made possible after the abduction experience had been reported hundreds of times, and the recurring elements noted; these were enumerated and clarified through the published work of folklorist Thomas Edward Bullard in 1986-87.[3]

When the extraterrestrial explanation dominated the phenomenon in the 1950s-60s it was considered outré to posit any sort of initiatory aspect to the experiences. The alternatives to the “ET visitors” hypothesis were very few. Only English professor and psychic researcher Dr. Meade Layne and his group Borderland Sciences saw “etherian” or interdimensionality as the answer (1946-1956); contactees such as Guy Ballard, George Adamski, and Truman Betherum preached on higher realms and their inhabitants via Theosophical language, but the vehicles they claimed to interact with were strictly made of unearthly metals. Carl Jung (1959) considered the UFOs’ religious and mythic aspects and their effects upon culture, but hedged upon the physicality of the “objects.”

To the hardcore science-minded, any connection to shamanism was not only absurd but unthinkable during that period, because shamanism was still considered a hallmark of the “primitive.” Mircea Eliade published his classic Shamanism: The Archaic Techniques of Ecstasy in French in 1951. It was translated to English a decade later, finding a limited academic audience. The book was a turning point in anthropology, however, because it showed the cross-cultural similarities of techniques and invalidated the reigning conception of shamans as “insane persons mistaken for supernaturally gifted sorcerers by traditional peoples.”

It was only when the extraterrestrial hypothesis (ETH) got jostled aside somewhat by the occult and paranormal angles of John Keel and Jacques Vallée in the 1970s that a family resemblance between “spirits” and “apparitions” and UFOs became discernable, and that was because these two investigators insisted on a more fine-grained examination of the witnesses’ lives and all the aspects of their experiences, no matter how absurd-seeming those experiences were. The ETH advocates concentrated on the “vehicle” descriptions and, once their reports were finalized in print, threw away the psychological effects on witnesses as noise-creating nonsense that was dirtying up their narrative. Keel and Vallée, however, uncovered psychic experiences including telepathy, psychokinesis, precognition, and effects on electrical devices. Vallée zeroed in on these phenomena throughout the 1970s and 80s, convincing preeminent expert J. Allen Hynek to cease ignoring the “high strange” encounters and surrounding aftereffects; Hynek, the world’s leading UFO expert, came to accept there was far more than metals to the manifestations. In addition, from the late 1960s onward, hypnotic regression came to be used in recovering “missing time” episodes associated with UFOs, led by University of Wyoming psychologist Dr. Leo Sprinkle.

But it required the “epidemic” of abduction reports 1980-1998 to bring clear symbolic meaning—and a narrative—to this aspect of the UFO mystery. By 1998, the surface parallels with shamanic initiation became undeniable. As far as I can tell, this is its timeline in the literature:

 

–While examining Native American nature spirit stories in their 1975 book The Unidentified Loren Coleman and Jerome Clark quote Eliade’s Shamanism on “little green men” who are often shamanic guardians of the Western Plateau and Northern California nations.[4] This mention is made in general relation to fairy lore and the global mythologies of small spirits.

 

–Australian researcher Bill Chalker writes an article in 1977 on the similarities between Aborigine shaman initiations and certain abduction features. This was somewhat prescient because the Betty Andreasson account (published 1979), considered the most detailed and “initiatory” encounter, had yet to be made public.

 

–British author John Rimmer concludes his 1984 The Evidence for Alien Abductions with a short discussion of shamanism with regard to abductions as mystical experiences that change the percipients into vegans, prophets, message-bearers, or healers. Apparently he drew the parallels on his own, without having read Chalker’s essay (although he cites Coleman and Clark’s The Unidentified in the bibliography).[5]

 

–Two of British researcher Hilary Evans’s books, in 1984 and 1987, reference shamanism in the context of otherworldly apparitions and UFO beings, but again, only in passing and without elaboration.[6]

 

Whitley Strieber’s 1987 Communion poses some problems. I don’t think Strieber mentions shamanism in the book, but his entire narrative amounts to an orgy of either synchronicities with or parallels with the “archaic techniques” of initiation. Several times during his encounters he feels as if his very existence as a person is dissolving, and he is subjected to intensely painful “operations” involving needles and other devices. Sexually-tinged emotions involving a “female” being similar to those of shamans with their “celestial wives” is hinted at in Communion, then made more explicit in the rest of his autobiographical books, especially 2016’s Super Natural.

 

–In 1988’s Abduction, Jenny Randles mentions in passing Bill Chalker’s study of parallels with Aboriginal myths and practices.[7]

 

–1989, the American folklorist Thomas E. Bullard publishes an article about UFO abduction reports entitled “The Supernatural Kidnap Narrative Returns in Technological Guise,” which claims “These accounts share many motifs with legends of supernatural encounters and otherworldly journeys.”[8] As noted above, this otherworld-journey aspect had long been a current in the UFO puzzle since Vallee published Passport to Magonia in 1969. As Vallee, John Keel, and Bullard were contending, otherworldly snatchings-away that involved nighttime encounters with lights, a sexual component, and transformation of the percipient have been occurring since the Neolithic period. Many times fairy encounters of the British Isles in particular involved the bestowal of “second sight” upon the percipient, allowing them interaction with the “Fair Folk” and then becoming a “wise woman” or “wise man,” that is, a community healer: the Anglo-Saxon equivalent of a shaman.

 

–Bill Chalker publishes another article in 1990 equating the two experiences.[9] He quotes from anthropologists Spencer and Gillen’s “The Northern Tribes of Central Australia” (1904), an excerpt from which we will examine below.
–By 1990, Harvard Medical School psychiatry professor John Mack informs Near-Death Experience researcher Dr. Kenneth Ring about the parallels between NDEs and certain aspects of the abduction experience. Ring had already noted the similarities between NDE experiences and shamanic initiatory ordeals (NDEs often have disturbing, transformative psychological and social aftermaths). Ring works with his graduate students on what he calls the Omega Project to determine what kind of person undergoes NDEs and abduction experiences. He finds that they seem to exhibit moderate-to-severe PTSD, possess fantasy-prone personalities, high abilities for creative visualization, ease in hypnotic dissociation, and increased psychic abilities such as telepathy, psychokinesis, and sometimes field effects that disrupt electronic devices. Most importantly, he also notes these same personality traits in anthropological and psychological studies of shamans.[10]

Angelsaliens

Keith Thompson’s great 1991 book Angels and Aliens popularizes the awareness of these “archaic” parallels growing within certain factions of the experiencer research community.[11] Thompson must have been following Kenneth Ring’s Omega Project NDE/abduction research as it was being undertaken, because the book was published the year the project wrapped up and mentions it. Angels and Aliens explicitly mentions an abduction connection to both shamanism and near death experiences on pages 88-89, and Thompson excoriates UFO investigators in failing to perceive the obvious parallels with archaic initiation and other seemingly “irrelevant nonsense” such as fairy abductions, the importance of which Jacques Vallée had clearly outlined two decades earlier.

Michael Talbot’s The Holographic Universe (1991) mentions Otherworldly beings such as fairies, Bigfoot, and “UFOnauts.” Given the book’s overall thesis that we perceive only a narrow band of sensible “vibrations,” he stops just short of declaring that anomalous things are part of a multiverse that our minds naturally filter out but can, at times, with the proper disinhibiting stimuli, see and interact with. He claims the entities may be part of an “omnijective” world, neither subjective nor objective. This is a clearer version of John Keel’s “superspectrum” hypothesis of the late 1960s. He brings up Ring’s work with NDE survivors, out-of-body experiencers, and their shamanic parallels and, like Thompson, mentions Ring’s (then) just-funded Omega project to make a comparative study on the three subjects.[12]

–With Kenneth Ring’s 1992 book The Omega Project appears the first apparent iteration of the “imaginal realm” hypothesis, which is similar to Talbot’s omnijective universe: that these beings and experiences occur in neither purely physical nor mental space, but a third “realm” that contains independently existing visions as well as receives those conjured up by people in states of concentration. This idea is taken from Sufi scholar Henri Corbin’s study of Sufi practices of visualization used to access the heavenly realms.

Similar practices to the Sufis’s are ancient. For instance, Hebrew Kabbalistic meditations and ritual exegesis on Pardes, Pantajali’s Yoga sutras of the 1st century, and Tibetan tantric visualizations (the creation of tulpas) all involve entering a realm of energy in which concentrated thoughts can either produce phantasms that achieve independent activity, or allow the mind/astral body access to a “parallel universe.” These roughly correspond to a shamanic otherworldly journey. The esoteric form of Kalachakra tantric practice, which is considered the most strenuous—and potentially dangerous[13]—way of achieving enlightenment involves celibacy, fasting, purifications, prostrations, prayers, and prodigious daily mantra recitation. It is essentially an extended series of rituals to achieve the type of expanded consciousness that shamans experience and use in their healing ceremonies. Thus the transformative aspects of both abductions and NDEs conceivably tie in with traditional mystical experiences—and become a part of New Age thinking.

–1994 is probably the high point for abduction-related publications. For five years, Dr. John Mack has worked with hundreds of “abductees” and is helping them accept their “ontologically shattering” memories, dreams, and experiences. He publishes Abduction: Human Encounters with Aliens in 1994.[14] Mack points out that the “vibratory chaos” some experiencers feel (and as Whitley Strieber vividly described in Communion) as they are transported into the round rooms of the “ships” mirrors in contemporary terms the dismemberment phase of shamanic induction.

Jim Schnabel’s 1994 book Dark White gives a summary of shamanic initiation, from the Siberian Buryat and Australian native traditions via quotes from Joseph Campbell and ethnologist Holger Kalweit. Schnabel emphasizes the transformative aspects of abductions and the idea of objects (usually crystals) being implanted in the shaman during the initiation that turn up in a technological guise in abduction reports as “implants” in the brain, ears, nose, calves, or behind the eyes.[15]

–The same year, in his book Grand Illusions, Gregory Little tells the story of Red Plume’s spirit quest at the Big Horn Great Medicine Wheel in Wyoming in 1800.[16] Red Plume was of the Crow Nation. For four days he fasted, prayed, and suffered the cold inside the cairn at the center of the Wheel. During his initiation he met four small spirits who brought him into their subterranean world beneath the mountain. He was shown a vision of a red eagle and his soul became airborne. He awoke outside the wheel with a red eagle feather. During his subsequent purification at the sweat lodge he told the Crow elders of his experience and was given the name Red Plume. Little goes on to enumerate other aspects of the “little people” spirits of the Crow and other nations, pointing out that they all consider the “dwarves” dangerous if spontaneously encountered but benign if sought out for legitimate medicine or knowledge-seeking motivations. The beings are intimately connected to the Medicine Wheel and certain rocks in the landscape, and are essentially the same helpers Coleman and Clark mentioned in 1975 by way of Mircea Eliade. Throughout the book, Little also analyzes the ancient mounds that cover the American continent and believes they are potent and exploitable sources of electromagnetic energies that First Nations medicine people used to communicate with the spirits. Little’s book is the first to connect up “spirit” abductions, shamanism, and EM anomalies to the high strangeness of some UFO encounters. His conclusion on what UFOs are is a variant of the psychic energy/electromagnetism exposure hypothesis put forward by Paul Deveraux and expanded during this same early 1990s period by Albert Budden.

–On the last page of his unique 1994 study Gifts of the Gods? researcher John Spencer mentions the shamanic parallel to one British “abductee” in particular, Elsie Oakensen, who became a psychic spiritual healer as a result of a UFO encounter and the missing time period associated with it.[17]

Harpur

Patrick Harpur publishes the monumental and influential work Daimonic Reality in 1995. His treatment of the abductee-shamanic initiation parallel is the deepest yet, embedded within a hypothesis that all “supernatural” encounters occur in an imaginal realm neither fully physical or fully mental—an idea, as we saw above, with a long pedigree in mysticism. He calls it the daimonic Otherworld. Following Jung and James Hillman, he connects up the “paranormal” as aspects of the world-soul that are, for lack of a better term, exteriorized synchronicities of psychic/emotional states. The idea is very subtle.

–UFO-obsessed billionaire Robert Bigelow creates the National Institute for Discovery Sciences in 1995, mainly to investigate the paranormal goings-on at the Gorman ranch in Utah, which he’d bought. Centuries ago, the Spanish taught the Ute people horsemanship and pressed the Navajo into slavery, and some Ute warriors engaged in an attempted genocide against the Navajo during the Civil War. In retaliation, according to the Ute, Navajo shamans placed a curse upon them that would last down the generations—a free roaming demonic being that occupied a wide swath of their lands in Utah: “the path of the Skinwalker.” Accounts at the Gorman ranch of strange animals impervious to bullets, apparitions, unexplained lights and electrical anomalies, cattle mutilations, and poltergeist activity compelled some NIDS researchers to consider these as manifestations of the legendary evil spirit. Bigelow funded many other UFO-related projects during this period, one of them being a 1999 paper by UCLA anthropology professor Douglass Price-Williams on Shamanism and UFO Abductions.[18] (Jacques Vallee also thanks Price-Williams in his 1990 book Confrontations, so he had been involved in the UFO/folklore field for some time previous to Bigelow’s commission).

–Dr. John Mack publishes Passport to the Cosmos (1999/2011).[19] Mack interviews three shamans who have interacted with the beings known as the greys, the “reptiles,” and other alien beings. The Zulu sangoma leader Vusumazulu Credo Mutwa claims a brutal initiation by the greys, who he calls the mantindane, and continuing sexual abuse by them in several abductions. To Mutwa, the greys are vampiric demons that are at the same time a part of humanity and symbolic of our future. Conversely, he encountered benign small blue beings who helped educate him when he was young,[20] and “Nordic” appearing entities who also taught him.[21] Bernardo Peixoto was born into the Uru-e Wau-Wau community near the Brazil-Venezuelan border. Their name means “people from the stars” and they trace their knowledge of agriculture to a race that arrived in a sky vehicle long ago.[22] In 1995, Peixoto encountered three “grey-like” creatures on the Irunduba River.[23] For hours he seemed in a trance as he followed them in a state of disorientation. In the aftermath he felt psychically shattered, yet eventually a healing power entered him and he became devoted to unifying the diverse traditional peoples of Brazil against the corporate destruction of the Amazon. Third, Mack interviews activist Sequoyah Trueblood and points out the Lakota and Cherokee belief that they are descendants of people from the Pleiades.[24]

Simon Brian Harvey-Wilson publishes the monograph thesis paper Shamanism and Alien Abductions: A Comparative Study in 2000. He notes that those UFO and abduction researchers who take the largest possible cultural-historical view of the phenomenon usually come to endorse the shamanic parallels. His own research involves interviews with 11 abductees from one of Mary Rodwell’s support groups.

Supernathancock

Graham Hancock’s 2007 book Supernatural: The Ancient Teachers of Mankind[25] ties together these many strands, and solely addresses the shamanic aspects of abductions, fairy encounters,[26] and DMT experiences. He focuses on the “spirit teachers” angle by way of Jeremy Narby’s thesis in The Cosmic Serpent. In that work, Narby claims DMT/ayahuasca/psilocybin placed human consciousness in direct relation to Otherworldly beings who taught the peoples of central and South America on a molecular level about the pharmacopeia their jungle surroundings contained. In other words, the Quecha, Aztec, and Mayan shamans symbolically learned the language of DNA and how this “serpent” inhabits every living thing. DNA is the vast communication system of a single organism. Hancock rejects the ET hypothesis and instead speculates on the release of endogenous DMT as the cause of alien abductions—but recent studies have shown that the pineal gland, which secretes the alkaloid in the brain, cannot ever produce enough of it to cause the entheogenic effects because it is synthesized too quickly.

– 2013: The History Channel’s “Ancient Aliens,” in its idiotically reductive bid to explain most of the products of human genius as extraterrestrial intervention, gives us “The Shamans” in season six. The less said about this one the better.

-During the 1980s through the 2000s, philosopher Terence McKenna lectures on the similarities between shamanic otherworld consciousness and UFO experiences in many interviews and talks.

-In their 2016 collaboration, religion scholar Jeffrey Kripal and Whitley Strieber attempt to contextualize Strieber’s many strange experiences in Super Natural: A New Vision of the Unexplained. Kripal runs through the shamanic parallels explicitly on pages 191-97, focusing on Strieber’s ear “implant,” which he has refused to remove, as emblematic of the traditional crystals that Siberian and Australian shamans have had placed into their “new” bodies during initiation.

So what in fact are the parallels? How does the evidence for this claim come together?

Skyboat

SHAMANIC INITIATION

Viewed from this angle, any “sickness-vocation” fills the role of an initiation; for the sufferings it brings on correspond to initiatory tortures, the psychic isolation of “the elected” is the counterpart to the isolation and ritual solitude of initiation ceremonies, and the imminence of death felt by the sick man (pain, unconsciousness, etc.) recalls the symbolic death represented in almost all initiation ceremonies.[27]

–Mircea Eliade

According to Eliade there are two primary ways a shaman is chosen: through hereditary profession or through extreme illness. The shaman’s actual initiation usually begins with a life-threatening physical episode, “psychotic” break, or extreme depressive episode.[28] The ancestral spirits and clan’s shamans may then visit the young person while in the delirium. The illness has induced a loss of soul, or a detachment of the astral body (soul) from the physical body. Whether “astral/spiritual” or physical, this body is then deconstructed, pulverized, and reassembled anew.

The ancestral spirits/shamans perform this work. The candidate is then led to a celestial or infernal place (sometimes both) to be taught by the master shaman-spirits. A totem animal appears and the young candidate associates with it (this may be the primordial form of the “witch’s familiar”). The animal’s spirit and the candidate’s become one. We should note that abduction researchers never tire of mentioning the animal forms—particularly owls (via Strieber’s Communion) and deer (via Virginia Horton’s experience in Budd Hopkins’s Missing Time [1981])—that are consciously associated with the kidnappings or function as unconscious “screen memories,” produced by the mind, to mask the traumatic appearance of the aliens.[29]

Eliade notes that some Yakut (Siberian) shamans have reported that their bones are scraped of flesh and tied or boiled together with iron.[30] J. Cowan (1992) writes of Australian Aborigine shamans being shown global cataclysms during their initiations.[31] Rock crystals, mostly quartz, are introduced into the shaman’s body in such diverse cultures as the Semang of the Malay peninsula, the Cabeno of South America, and the Aranda, Utmatjera, and Wotjobaluk of Australia.[32] Ioan Couliano describes how both African and Australian shamans gain power from a “rainbow serpent” that protects sacred healing crystals that are given during initiation.[33] Here’s an example from Bill Chalker’s 1990 article, quoting anthropologists Spencer and Gillen’s “The Northern Tribes of Central Australia” (1904):

An aborigine, Kurkutji, was set upon by two spirits, Mundadji and Munkaninji, in a cave: “Mundadji cut him open, right down the middle line, took out all of his insides and exchanged them for those of himself, which he placed in the body of Kurkutji. At the same time he put a number of sacred stones in his body.

After it was all over, the youngest spirit, Munkaninji, came up and restored him to life, told him that he was now a medicine-man and showed him how to extract bones and other forms of evil magic out of them. Then he took him away up into the sky and brought him down to earth close to his own camp, where he heard the natives mourning for him, thinking that he was dead.

For a long time he remained in a more or less dazed condition, but gradually he recovered and the natives knew that he had been made into a medicine-man. When he operates the spirit Mukaninji is supposed to be near at hand watching him, unseen of course by ordinary people.”

The last paragraph in particular pertains to many repeat abductees: they reports feelings of anticipation when they “know” an incident is going to occur in the near future, or sense they are being constantly monitored either by implant or telepathically by the aliens. The beings become, in a sense, “spirit guides.” Many believe that they have been permanently changed mentally, emotionally, and spiritually by their encounters—and the beings play on ongoing role in this evolution of their personal humanity. Sometimes during the period of abduction, the experiencer appears asleep or in a trance to other people; the observers may experience something strange in the environment, but the experiencer does not depart the area.[34] This implies a sort of “astral body travel” to an otherworld, just like the shaman. Often times this is achieved for the shaman via a silver or “fiery” cord that extrudes from the stomach, belly button, solar plexus, or head.[35] The shaman becomes entranced and uses this cord to climb to the heavens or spin a web on which to travel to view distant events.[36] There are a few reports of such cords in abduction literature.

Shamans are called wounded healers in part because their consciousness is only halfway “in consensus reality” due to the personality dissociation induced by their traumatic initiation—which is considered to them a gift and not a liability. Second, they consciously relive their traumatic initiation as a part of their skill to self-induce trance (but without the abreactive adjustment that heals a “crippled psyche,” as our psychotherapy would have it). A third meaning is that they have sacrificed a normal life in the clan in order to occupy their liminal office; a fourth aspect is that they literally injure themselves in the course of their medico-spiritual treatments of people through fasting, bloodletting, conscious pain induction via self-harm with needles, spikes, or arrows, and massive drug intake, all in order to enter the trance in which they commune with their spirit masters and animal guides.[37]

CAVES AND NAVES

Cavepainting

The traditions of using a cave for ritual sensory deprivation, spirit journeys, and symbolic rebirth continued from the Paleolithic well into recorded history, especially with the Greek practices of iatromancy or “sleep cures” at the night temples of Asclepius and Apollo. These were natural caves around which a temple had been built. Here the patient becomes, in a sense, a deputized shaman and charged with using their daimon-intermediaries to discover their own treatment. Climbing into the confined dark space of the caves, and perhaps with the use of either psychotropic or sedative herbs, the sick person has visions or dreams of messages in symbolic form delivered by their daimon (or perhaps even the healing gods Asclepius or Apollo). Upon exiting the cave they would approach the priest for the vision’s interpretation and then be given a course of appropriate medicines for the cure. The parallels to shamanic practice and oracular clairvoyance are obvious.

The cave has always been one of the most powerfully symbolic of places, evoking both the chthonic “womb of earth” from which all life came, the maternal womb, and a representation the celestial vault of the nighttime heaven to which we may rise in the afterlife. Most archaeologists and paleoanthropologists agree that shamans used the famous Chauvet, Lascaux, Coliboaia, and Altamira painted caves of 18-38,000 years ago for rituals and possibly for initiations.

CONTEMPORARY OTHERWORLD EXPERIENCERS

As we’ve noted from the anthropological literature, the non-hereditary candidate suffers the following events in the calling and course of initiation:

-Illness/Mental symptoms of uncontrolled “fantasy” or psychosis

-Spontaneous entrancement due to illness/psychosis

-Paralysis/catalepsy

-Dismemberment by spirit beings

-Reassembly by spirit beings

-Learning from elder shaman spirits

-Gradual reintegration of self & into society, with conversion to a healing profession, including

For a hereditary shaman candidate these same events occur, but the psychosis/entrancement are induced through some form of controlled, ritual fasting, breathing, dancing, drug-taking, chanting, drumming, or other methods and under the supervision of an elder shaman. Usually a vision-quest is required in which the candidate must remain alone in a cave or in the wilderness for a time until the requisite spirits contact them, as in Red Plume’s experience above.

As to the life-transformative aspects of abduction experiences, there’s no better example than what happened to the “Avis” (Day) family. In the 1974 Aveley, England encounter, John Day and his family saw a UFO and encountered a glowing green fog that interfered with their car while traveling home at night. The radio sparked, the car vibrated, they felt very cold, and it became silent as they passed through it. Three hours were found to be missing when they arrived home. In the experience’s immediate aftermath (and three years prior to hypnotic regression), John abruptly gave up a three-pack a day cigarette habit; the family (except one child of three) gave up eating meat; the parents became teetotalers; the child Kevin, formerly lagging in his studies, became an exemplary student; John quit his job but eventually obtained sought-after employment working with the handicapped; Elaine went back to college and became a confident artist; the couple became very concerned with environmental and health issues. There was also poltergeist-like activity in their house for several years, and both parents had recurring dreams of ugly, gnome-like beings around John as he lay upon a table.

Avisabduc

John was hypnotized in 1977. He remembered a bright beam of light hitting the car as they entered the green mist. He found himself in a big room where three tall beings in one-piece colorless suits with balaclava-like headgear examined him. They possessed cloudy, pink eyes. Only one communicated with him telepathically. They told him not to worry about his children. They ran a “honeycombed” wand-like instrument over his body. A small, furry being was also present; it made chirping sounds and seemed the helper to the tall beings. He asked where they came from; they showed him “a map but not a map”, and gave an explanation of which he could remember only the word “Phobos,” which “meant nothing to (John)” but is, of course, one of Mars’s moons. Asked why they were here, they told him it didn’t matter because they were always here, and had “more than one base.” Their propulsion system used a magnetic “vortex.” John felt he was prevented from saying any more.

Before John and Elaine’s hypnotic regression in 1977, all of them traced their life changes to their encounter with the green mist that night. The intervention of an “otherworldly force,” whatever it was, had a profound effect on the entire family. The UFO, fog, and three hours’ missing time were clues that something extraordinary occurred, although beyond conscious memory, but whatever it was, it had spiritual results in their lives.

This transformation, whether sudden (like the Day family’s) or gradual, has been documented in hundreds of abduction cases.[38] The list of parallels to shamanic initiation in the abduction literature is so long that I will just touch on a few. Most prominent are the sensations undergone at the abduction outset, in which “disassembly” by blue or blue-white “light” occurs as one passes through walls or roofs to the “craft.” Sometimes it is done via a thin or thick beam from the UFO above or outside the house/car. This seems to echo the “silver cord” or web-strand the shaman uses to climb the rope of heaven. Many repeat abductees report invasive “medical procedures” by the alien beings. These can include surgical operations, healings (curing of terminal and non-life-threatening diseases),[39] psychological “tests,” induced pregnancies, subsequent removal of implanted embryos or fetuses, and subjection to pain-threshold levels that have no discernable function. Psychotherapist Dr. Edith Fiore reported operations upon both body and the head during abductions by half a dozen of her hypnotized subjects.[40] In one, crystals were placed into the skull of an abductee, and the subject was “flayed” and their cancer removed.[41] Yet another was told she would become a healer as a result of the aliens’ interventions.[42] John Mack’s patient Karin experienced the removal and replacement of her heart.[43] Abductee Sandy Larson, in a famous 1976 case, had her brain “removed” and replaced during her experience.[44] Betty Andreasson had an eye removed to have an implant placed in her brain, and had objects placed in her spine.[45] Amy, one of the women interviewed at length for Karla Turner’s book Taken, speaks of an otherworldly council influencing Amy’s life from a young age. She was shown how to levitate objects, affect electrical equipment, and move through solid objects.[46] The chart Turner displays on pages 215-22 of Taken shows common aspects of the experiences the eight women she interviewed had undergone in dreams or altered states of consciousness: Five reported head surgery of some kind, three a “nasal implant,” five an “ear implant,” six a “spirit-body separation,” six a teaching session, four sexual activity, three witnessed surgery performed on another human present, and four seemed to be in an “underground city.” There are also many dozens of reports of persons experiencing a “download” cascade of information into their consciousness that some believe effects the spiritual transformation they eventually undergo.[47] Others think this overload is either a psychological test, or a preparation for eventual “activation” as agents of the “aliens” when a world cataclysm is to happen in the future.[48]

Caves or cave-like structures appear many times in abduction reports.[49] By the early 1990s, cave-abductions became explicitly present in the literature; many dozens of experiencers recounted being taken to caverns where hundreds of other humans were supposedly seen—as well as human military and medical “collaborators” with the “aliens.”[50] These subterranean spaces are represented either as tunneled bases built directly into the bedrock or a series of structures (and strange craft) inside a hangar-like cavern. Abductees undergo the same medical procedures as in the round rooms within the “vehicles” in these caverns.

Writers such as Colin Wilson, Graham Hancock, and John Mack have pointed out the similarities between those who undergo out-of-body experiences and the shaman’s trip to the heaven/upper world and underworld—the ability to “fly” to obtain information on behalf of their querents or ill persons, whose souls the shaman must retrieve. Many people who are adept at inducing OBEs (“astral projection”) report being very ill at some point when young. Sylvan Muldoon, who wrote two books on the subject, was sickly as a child and had his first OBE at age eleven.[51] In Holger Kalweit’s Dreamtime and Inner Space, he notes many OBE and consequent spirit journey experiences undergone by various shamans occurred while these individuals were either extremely ill or (by witnesses’ accounts) dead, in coma, or a cataleptic state. As noted above, in many instances a cord, rope, or web-strand attached to the belly button, the fontanel, or the back of the neck is mentioned that guides the spirit back to the body. [52] The shamans consider these illnesses transformative, as we’ve noted, allowing them to experience the interconnection between the spiritual and material worlds.

In many shamanic cultures, a spirit may seduce or even rape the candidate and become a “sky-wife” or “sky-husband” to them.[53] During hypnotic regression, the entranced experiencer very often speaks of already knowing the sequence of events and the (alien) beings. Sometimes they say that they even “love” these beings. Some abductees call the “leader” being (with whom they claim to be the most familiar) either their “soul mate,” or a part of their soul.[54] Whitley Strieber speculatively discusses this idea in Communion. For abductees, this phenomenon usually occurs in those who have a history of interactions going back to early childhood, but is initially remembered during the recall of a recent experience. Does this bond exist because there are in fact multiple unrecalled events that occurred earlier in their lives? Or do abductees feel this during hypnosis because they are trying to normalize, in any way possible, the beings’ appearance to lessen their shock at (re-)experiencing it? In other words, is there an emotional reversal (enantiodromia, as Jung called it) from terror to love due to the unconscious realization that these beings are a “missing” or “unacknowledged” part of humanity’s psyche, but experienced for them as a personal relationship for the abductee? For the shaman, the cosmic pairing with a spirit spouse is many times inevitable and done with great reluctance. It is the same with abductees; many are highly ambivalent about their emotional attachment to the beings.[55] For abductee-turned-researcher Karla Turner, these inappropriate moments amount to a form of induced Stockholm Syndrome (via the practice of “love-bombing” that most cults perform on a target individual) and are probably achieved by means of stimulating the limbic system and inducing an overwhelming dopamine cascade.

LIGHTNING SHAMANS

Candidacy in the Siberian cultures may involve lightning strikes or being hit by “stones from the sky.”[56] Holger Kalweit speaks of “lightning shamans,” and devotes a chapter of his book to those individuals who became shamans due to direct or close-by lightning strikes.[57] The shock may have produced in them the state of electro-hypersensitivity and its consequent array of allergic pathologies. Hypothetically this would manifest by the person’s reactions to fluctuations in the earth’s ambient electromagnetic field due to seismic faultlines and their resultant earthlights (piezoelectric phenomena), ionization of the atmosphere before storms, ball lightning, etc. Magnetized rocks and meteorites attract metals, and seem to defy the normal physical world; EM anomalies in the landscape could thus affect these individuals also. Persons deeply sensitized to electromagnetic fields may enter trance spontaneously and further be able to produce unconscious or even conscious psychokinetic effects by way of these EM “hot spots.”[58]

Lightning strikes are a minority in the spectrum of initiatory sicknesses the shaman undergoes. But these two phenomena reflect those that accompany poltergeists. Emotionally disturbed young people have been found to be the “focus” in many poltergeist “infestations,” so it makes sense that a young person entering puberty,[59] which is when these initiatory sicknesses or calls usually occur in traditional societies, could unconsciously manifest the “psychic stress overload” through environmental and electrical PK effects, marking them as potential shamans.[60] Eliade points out that in many cultures sickly or eccentric or withdrawn youths are singled out as candidates if there is no hereditary shamanism present in the society.[61] Are these kids born allergy-prone, or come to possess weakened immune systems due to malnutrition?

AN ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD CONNECTION?

Electromagnetic atmospheric phenomena must have inspired fear and reverence in early humankind—lightning foremost, of course, but also ball and bead lightning, plasmas, and static fields. What would early humanity have made of will-o-the-wisps or long-lived forms of ball lightning rolling across the landscape and darting into the sky? Or the shimmering curtains of plasma formations that covered the sky during solar coronal mass ejections that happened to strike the planet? From what we now know of these rare phenomena, and how dangerous they can be, humans in the Paleolithic and before who came close to earthbound energies most certainly were injured in both short and long-term ways, or even killed by them. The manifestations’ seemingly purposeful movement probably led to belief that they were living beings.

Did we interact with these energies—or perhaps the shamans even learn to control them?

Entopticchart

In Supernatural, Graham Hancock discusses at length the figures in prehistoric rock art that are depicted pierced multiple times with arrows, spears, or needles. These figures are commonly believed to be shamans. He puts forward the hypothesis that these depict “pins and needles” sensations the shamans experienced as the product of drug-induced trance—but these sensations could just as easily be nervous system reactions to intense EM fields, the kinds with which we are all familiar when we are accidentally shocked. Static electricity of course galvanizes the skin, and in very strong amounts can cause prickling sensations. Strong EM fields can disrupt the temporal lobes, causing hallucinations in all the senses. Further, many of the vividly colored entoptic visual disruptions that he compares to some cave drawings easily have mundane causes, such as scotoma (painless migraines that present jagged visual auras), epilepsy, and the precedent to full migraine attacks.

Piercedman

In two underrated books, British researcher Albert Budden explored the electro-hypersensitivity hypothesis with regard to abductions, and found plausible explanations for both the major and minor components of the experiences. What is important with regard to his hypothesis is the physical and symbolic sicknesses undergone by shaman and experiencer both. The EHS sufferer is physically endangered by their immune system reactions, and for Budden the “aliens” or “apparitions” are a form of warning system generated by the unconscious (or “universal intelligence” as he calls it) during altered states of consciousness that these overlapping ambient/anthropogenic electrical fields are harmful to them. Secondary abduction phenomena that Budden ingeniously explains by this hypothesis are: a sudden or gradual dampening of sound in the immediate vicinity; a humming, hissing, or throbbing sound heard just as the experience commences (both which are symptomatic of temporal lobe stimulation by EM currents); very high-pitched noises similar to tinnitus; a series of loud clicking or popping sounds (which Budden explains could be the heating/expansion of tiny bones in the ear canal reacting to the sufferer’s lowered resistance to microwaves); the “crunching sound” many have reported in the nose or brain while an “implant” is placed up the nostril (EM-stimulated magnetite motes that have been deposited over a long period in the upper nasal passages); depersonalized or out-of-body sensations (temporal lobe disruption); and the small patterned burns, scars, “scoop marks,” and bruises, which could be caused by psychophysical action upon the body while in a dissociative state of consciousness (the abduction experience) brought on by an electromagnetic field overload.

In his book Daimonic Reality, Patrick Harpur points out the shaman-abductee parallels in the case of the famous experiencer Debbie Jordan-Kauble, who was weakened by multiple illnesses at an early age.[62] Budden mentions Jordan-Kauble’s poor health in connection to electro-hypersensitivity as a direct cause of her subsequent “alien” experiences and her ability to affect electrical devices.[63]

Along with and sometimes preceding the aural disturbance, a blue-white light is many times seen at the abduction’s onset. Is this the perception of an fast strobe light, which obviously might be able to induce trance or seizures in persons? Such stimulation might also account for the feeling of one’s “vibrations’ increasing” during the opening of the event and passage through a window into the “room” where the experience occurs. San and Australian shamans report going into highly energetic trance in which the silver fire “ropes” carry them into the realm of the spirits high in the sky.

Sundrysynchronicities

SUNDRY SYNCHRONICITIES AND THE TRANCEFORMATION OF ONE’S LIFE

We have seen that one of the commonest forms of the future shaman’s election is in encountering at divine or semi-divine being, who appears to him through a dream, a sickness, or some other circumstance, tells him that he has been “chosen,” and incites him henceforth to follow a new rule of life.[64]

The appearance of a bird, especially an eagle, is interpreted as a sign of shamanic vocation.[65] Eagle is the “father of shamans” in many cultures.[66]

The world tree also figures in shamanic journeying as the source of powers. Eliade mentions the belief that the eggs hanging upon the world tree contain eagles that are actually the spirits of future shamans.[67] Some of John Mack’s experiencer patients reported eagles and other “power animals” during their abductions.[68] We already noted the animal spirit with whom the shaman binds themself and the “screen memories” of strange animals. Betty Andreasson is a deeply religious Christian, yet her first recalled abduction vision contained a pagan psychodrama from antiquity of a death/rebirth mytheme involving the shamanic animal, the eagle/phoenix.[69]

In Supernatural, Graham Hancock points out the parallel visions of the shamanic “eggs on the world tree” and the high-tech “baby nurseries” many experiencers have reported: A “wall” of amniotic sacs within cylinders or cube-shaped containers containing hybrid alien-human fetuses.[70] I don’t believe Hancock is stretching in emphasizing this similarity. One could also make the case that the column sometimes seen in the center of the “ship’s engine room” also serves the same function as a treetrunk-like symbol of power.[71] Abductee Charles Moody described the “engine” as three strut-joined half-eggs that contained diamond crystals inside them.[72]

Eliade mentions that the spirits “count the bones” of the resurrected shaman before their teaching procedures begin.[73] There are many reports of the “alien beings” touching and counting the abductees’ ribs to “see if it’s okay.” The beings never explain the mysterious procedure.

The famous Mazatec curandera Maria Sabina, who had taken psilocybin mushrooms thousands of times since age 11 in her career as a shaman, was illiterate yet absorbed the contents of a book given to her by a spirit. She received a “download,” as experiencers like to say, of an enormous amount of information about the other worlds and healing.[74] Maria was not allowed to keep the book, which “belonged in the sky”—just like the fates of the books given to Betty Hill and Betty Andreasson during their abductions.[75] The “angel” Quazgaa gave Andreasson a “blue book” in her 1967 experience whose at first blank but luminous pages contained information that at some point she was to remember. This is a universal motif (at some point in the relationships) when dealing with “higher intelligences”; Joseph Smith, occultist and founder of the Latter Day Saints, was given a special scrying/reading crystal in order to decipher the angelic language on the golden tablets the angel Moroni had shown him, which became the Book of Mormon. The tablets were given back to the being.

Mongolian shaman

THE OUTSIDER

The shaman or prophet assumes a statusless status, external to the secular social structure, which gives him the right to criticize all structure-bound personae in terms of a moral order binding on all.[76]

–Victor Turner (1969)

This “right to criticize” applied to the “space brother prophets” of the 1950s such as George Adamski (who condemned our society’s violence, our misconceived notions about time, and inability to perceive the “oneness of everything”), but equally to some abductees who have found a calling in healing professions considered marginal to mainstream medicine that involve clairvoyant or empathetic skills. Anthropologist Turner emphasized the idea of liminality, in both the shaman/experiencer’s “chosenness” and initiation by spirits and their eventual social status that results from embracing it as a reality. In the case of the shaman they are elevated in status, but in the abductee’s case it is a lowering of social status in the general community—but perhaps raising it within the boundaries of the experiencer community. Whether these initiation events occur in a “physical reality” or psychic space, their effect on the individual is the same. Socially, there is a parallel between the liminal status of the shaman in society and the “repeat experiencer.” Abductees for the most part have been shunned or denigrated by mainstream science in the same manner as ethnographers and anthropologists once dismissed shamans and even their entire tribes as irrational degenerates. Plato’s parable of the cave may be considered a shamanic myth, and its point is not unlike what the abductee claims to experience. For shaman, mystic, and experiencer, who have had Plato’s allegorical “experience of the sun,” scorn pours out onto those who stay content before the cave wall’s shadows.

Just as the shamanic vocation is considered hereditary in many cultures, some abductees and investigators are convinced the experiences run in families, as if a bloodline were being followed or manipulated over generations.[77]

Since our culture doesn’t properly ritualize the transition to puberty and adulthood as in traditional societies, there is no structure or vocabulary for the children in the “developed” world to contextualize or describe Other experiences. Their experiences, no matter their age, are “infantilized.” This “infantilization” equally applies to criticisms of adult experiencers by the overculture; debunkers relegate their memories and events to repressed childhood traumas, “birth memories,” and the sleep paralysis/“night hag” phenomenon. Young children have their imaginary companions and are eventually taught to separate this function of their mind from the real world. Those who are experiencers, however, describe the utter reality of the “weird looking” child companions they once had (especially their night visitors) and how their parents disbelieved their trips to rooms the sky where they played with both other normal children and the “strange” ones.[78]

THE EVER-TENTATIVE CONCLUSION

When we jettison the high tech trappings and examine the form of these experiences, they contain all manner of “traditional paranormality”: astral travel/OBEs, NDE-like passages, poltergeist activity, psychokinesis, telepathy, clairvoyance, “spirit meetings.” Both contemporary hereditary shamans and the “Western” individuals who have had otherworldly experiences via, say, Michael Harner’s shaman workshops do not report UFOs, aliens, or abduction experiences in their journeys.[79] For them, their shamanic experiences still involve spirits, power animals, and the traditional imagery that accompanies it. As Graham Hancock points out, Dr. Rick Strassman’s legal and public experiments with pure DMT induced in a large number of its participants the elements of abduction imagery: greys, insect-like sentient creatures, round rooms, examination tables, etc. but the subjects were simply reclining on a hospital bed when these veridical experiences occurred. Their minds entered another space.

Since shamanic initiation and abductions are only similar but not identical in form or result (many persons, after all, don’t have transformative life changes associated with abductions) and “traditional” shamanic experiences still occur without the high tech trappings we must conclude that whatever force(s) is behind the UFO phenomenon is somehow aping the vocabulary of the shamanic experience (or causing the human mind to create a symbolic shamanic-like experience). Are the results similar? We must conclude with a qualified yes: in the short term the person experiences John Mack’s “ontological shock.” Their world-views are disrupted and often turned upside down. In the long term, some are given a type of “second sight” in line with the cunning folk/Celtic shamans whose powers were often induced by fairy encounters: they continue to have interactions with non-human intelligences.


[1] Schnabel, Jim. Dark White: Aliens, Abductions, and the UFO Obsession, Penguin Books Ltd, 1995, pg. 139, quoting Holger Kalweit’s Dreamtime and Inner Space: The World of the Shaman, Shambhala Publications, 1988.

[2] Fowler, Raymond. The Andreasson Affair: The True Story of a Close Encounter of the Fourth Kind, New Page Books, 2014, pg. 35.

[3] Bullard, Thomas E., UFO Abductions: The Measure of a Mystery, 2 Vols., FUFOR, Mt. Rainier, MD, 1987.

[4] Clark, Jerome and Coleman, Loren, The Unidentified and Creatures of the Outer Edge, Anomalist Books, 2006, reprint from 1975, pg. 65.

[5] Rimmer, John, The Evidence for Alien Abductions, Thorsons Publishing, 1984, 138-43.

[6] Evans, Hilary, Visions Apparitions Alien Visitors: A Comparative Study of the Enigma, Aquarian Press, 1984; 235-36; Gods, Spirits, Cosmic Guardians: A Comparative Study of the Encounter Experience, HarperCollins, 1988. 41, 237.

[7] Randle, Jenny, Abduction, Guild Books, 1988. 33-34.

[8] The Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 102, No. 404 (Apr. – Jun., 1989), pp. 147-170.

[10] Ring, Kenneth, The Omega Project: Near-Death Experiences, UFO Encounters, and Mind-at-Large, William Morrow & Co., 1992. 64-65, 85, 92, 108, 218-19, 234;

[11] Thompson, Keith, Angels and Aliens: UFOs and the Mythic Imagination, Ballantine Books, 1993. 154-58, 188, 232.

[12] Talbot, Michael. The Holographic Universe, Harper Perennial, 1991, 276-285.

[13] That is, through strenuous disciplines that awaken the energy coiled at the base of the spine, it is meant to wipe out the karmic accretions one has accumulated over many lifetimes within a finite time-period. For the improperly initiated or novice this can have devastating emotional and mental effects. The full Kalachakra cycle includes confronting heavenly and hellish beings which the monk or nun eventually subdues in order to use the beings’ powers towards achieving nirvana; these entities are considered aspects of the initiate’s own “compounded” illusory existence, but stripped of personal attributes; in other words, they are transpersonal or archetypal representations of cognitive-emotional states of being. Whether “imaginal” or energetically real, conquering them and utilizing their existential energy towards liberation is the goal of the initiate.

[14] Mack, John E. Abduction: Human Encounters with Aliens, Scribner, 1994.

[15] Schnabel (1995), 136-39

[16] Little, Gregory L. Grand Illusions: The Spectral Reality Lying Behind Sexual UFO Abductions, Crashed Saucers, Afterlife Experiences, Sacred Ancient Ritual Sites & Other Enigmas, Eagle Wing Books, 1994.

[17] Spencer, John. Gifts of the Gods?: Are UFOs Alien Visitors or Psychic Phenomena? Virgin Publishers, 1995.

[19] Mack, John. Passport to the Cosmos: Human Transformation and Alien Encounters, Three Rivers Press, 2011.

[20] Mack (2011), 203.

[21] Mack (2011), 208.

[22] Mack (2011), 169.

[23] Incidentally, this location is 900 miles west at the exact latitude as the 1977-84 events Jacques Vallee writes about in his book Confrontations. During that period glowing orbs and “flying buses” were shooting “beams” that killed, sickened, and burned many night hunters and villagers in northern Brazil. The area was so remote that medical intervention was minimal to none during this “wave.” Vallee personally traveled to the isolated area in 1990 to interview the witnesses and victims. See Confrontations: A Scientist’s Search for Alien Contact, Anomalist Books, 2008, pgs. 124-39, 200-226.

[24] Mack (2011), 181.

[25] Hancock, Graham, Supernatural: Meetings with the Ancient Teachers of Mankind, Disinformation Books, 2007.

[26] Hancock (2007), 161-66.

[27] Eliade, pg. 33.

[28] It is interesting to note that many persons become writers, artists, or scientists due to prolonged illness in youth by which they either have a consciousness-changing experience, or they use their long convalescence to develop a hobby that becomes a lifelong passion.

[29] See Mike Clelland’s The Messengers: Owls, Synchronicity, and the UFO Abductee, Richard Dolan Press, 2015; Vallee, Jacques. Passport to Magonia: From Folklore to Flying Saucers, Daily Grail Publishing, 2014, pg. 58; Hopkins (1987), 91-92, 100; Strieber (1987), 21-22, 116-17, 145, 298-300; Mack (2011), 152-157, 295; Smith, Yvonne (2008), 116-17, 138-49, 144-47; Anglin, Elizabeth. Experience: Memoirs of an Abducted Childhood, Vol. 1, Sacred Peak Press, 2014, pgs. 38-42; Hopkins and Rainey (2004), 230-38; Turner, Karla. Into the Fringe: A True Story of Alien Abduction, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2014, pgs. 84, 124-43 (the latter is an extended account of a shared hallucinatory episode at a real cabin with “screen memory” elements to it); Hough and Kalman, (1997), pgs. 78-80; Wilson, Colin, Alien Dawn: An Investigation into the Contact Experience, Fromm International, 1998, pg. 7; Boylan (1994), 115.

[30] Eliade, 36. There is a long tradition in the British Isles that fairies cannot abide the presence and even sound of iron (such as a bell). Could we thus speculate that fairies as known by the Celtic Anglo culture and the master shaman spirits, whether celestial or infernal, are not the same beings as the fee?

[31] Cowan, J. Mysteries of the Dream Time, Woollahra, NSW, Unity Press, 1992. Quoted by Harvey-Wilson, Simon Brian. Shamanism and Alien Abductions: A Comparative Study, Edith Cowan University, 2000, pg. 51.

[32] Eliade, pgs. 45-52.

[33] Couliano, I.P. Out of this World: Otherworldly Journeys from Gilgamesh to Albert Einstein, Shambhala Publications, 1991, pgs. 44-45.

[34] See Watts, Barry, UFOs Down Under: Australasian Encounters, Barry Watts Publications, 2017, for the case of Maureen Puddy, who was abducted “astrally” in the presence of two other people; Turner, Karla, Masquerade of Angels,

[35] Kalweit (1988), 48-51; Wilson, Colin. Mysteries: An Investigation into the Occult, the Paranormal, and the Supernatural, Watkins Publishing, 2006, 377-78; Hancock (2007), 126-31.

[36] Couliano (1991), 44.

[37] Kalweit,

[38] See Mack, John, 1994 & 2011; Boylan, Richard J. Close Extraterrestrial Encounters: Positive Experiences with Mysterious Visitors, Wild Flower Press, 1994, 36-46, 157-69; Rutkowski, Chris A. Abductions and Aliens: What’s Really Going On, Durdurn, 1999, 212-28; Randles, Jenny (1984), 83-84; Strieber (1989), 73-77;

[39] Dennett, Preston, and Dennett, Christine. UFO Healings: True Accounts of People Healed by Extraterrestrials, Wild Flower Press, 1996.

[40] Fiore, Edith. Encounters: A Psychologist Reveals Case Studies of Abductions by Extraterrestrials, Doubleday, 1989, 121-23

[41] Fiore (1989), 89-91.

[42] Fiore (1989), 96.

[43] Mack (2011), 142.

[44] Lorenzen, Coral and Jim. Abducted! Confrontations with Beings from Outer Space, Berkley Publishing, 1977, 63.

[45] Fowler, Raymond. The Andreasson Affair Phase Two: The Continuing Investigation of a Woman’s Abduction by Alien Beings, Prentice Hall Trade, 1982, 137-46.

[46] Turner (1994), 176-77.

[47] This is a fairly “routine” experience when a person encounters “UFOnauts,” from the contactee phenomenon of the early 1950s right up to the present day. See Bullard, Thomas E. (2010), 214; Strieber (1987), 119; Randles (1984), 103; Mack (1994), 224, 243; Mack (2011), 94-98; Ring (1992), 51; Hough, Peter and Kalman, Moyshe. The Truth About Alien Abductions, Sterling Publishing Company, 1997, pg. 111; Swords, Michael. Grassroots UFOs: Case Reports from the Center for UFOs Studies, Anomalist Books, 2005, pgs. 94-95; Turner (2013), 39, 173; Marden and Stoner, (2013), 212; Jacobs (1993), 197; Fiore (1989), 162, 182-83; Harpur, Patrick. Daimonic Reality: A Field Guide to the Otherworld, Pine Winds Press, 2003, pgs. 184-85; Thompson, Richard L. Alien Identities: Ancient Insights into the Modern UFO Phenomenon, Govardhan Hill Publisher, 1995, pgs. 126-27; Smith, 158-65 (“induced” visions of plans for an engine).

[48] Jacobs, David. The Threat, (1999), 236; Strieber (1987), 252, 265-66; Mack (2011), 93-119,

[49] Hancock (2007), 131-132.

[50] See Mack (2011), Fowler (2014), The Watchers by Raymond Fowler (1990), The Watchers II, Fowler (1995), Taken by Karla Turner (1994), Lost was the Key by Leah Haley (1995), Reaching for Reality by Constance Clear (1999).

[51] Wilson (2006), 377-78.

[52] Kalweit, Holger, Dreamtime and Inner Space: The World of the Shaman, Shambhala Press, 1988, 48-51.

[53] Eliade (1974), 73, 76-77, 79, 133, 168, 344, 381, 421; Hancock (2007), 150-60; 188-92.

[54] Mack (1994), Boylan (1994), 69, 87, 89.

[55] In traditional Celtic lore, fairies may entrance, kidnap, and rape humans. This can produce hybrid children, whom Graham Hancock (amongst others) believes may be the changelings who are placed in substitution of stolen human children. That’s one possibility; the other is that the changelings are “pure-bred” but deformed fairy children. Yet there are also innumerable tales of humans falling in love with a fairy, whether the humans are “glamoured” or of their own will. These “marriages” often result in children who have great difficulty living in either world. Sometimes the human has been given the “second sight” to perceive fairies and their world prior to these couplings—and also become healers by fairy tutoring. See Hancock (2007), 177-81; 192-203 for the changeling-hybrid enigma.

[56] Eliade, pgs. 19, 32, 55.

[57] Kalweit, Holger, Shamans, Healers, and Medicine Men. Shambhala Books, 2000.

[58] See Shallis, Michael. The Electric Connection: Its Effects on Mind and Body, New Amsterdam Books, 1998.

[59] Eliade, 26.

[60] Heath, Pamela Rae. The PK Zone: A Cross-Cultural Review of Psychokinesis (PK), iUniverse, 2003, 167-69; Wilson, Colin, Poltergeist! A Study in Destructive Haunting, G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1982, 158-60, 262, 361-62; Rogo, D. Scott, Mind Over Matter: The Case for Psychokinesis, Thorsons, 1986, 84-87; Shallis, Michael. The Electric Connection: Its Effects on Mind and Body, New Amsterdam Books, 1998, 194, 207.

[61] Eliade, 24-26.

[62] Harpur, Patrick. Daimonic Reality: A Field Guide to the Otherworld, Pine Winds Press, 2003, (1995), 235-36.

[63] Budden Albert. Psychic Close Encounters, Blandford Books, 1999, 145-46, 179.

[64] Eliade, 67.

[65] Eliade, 69.

[66] Eliade (1974), 69, 128, 160.

[67] Eliade, 70.

[68] Mack (2011), 149 for eagle; 148-152.

[69] Fowler (2015), 102-05.

[70] Hancock (2007), 160-64.

[71] Lorenzen and Lorenzen (1977), 47-49; Fowler (1982), Andreasson,

[72] Lorenzen, (1977), 48-49.

[73] Eliade, 42.

[74] This experience is also similar to the angel “transmissions” the mystic polymath Emanuel Swedenborg claimed in a trance to have received and by which he said angels regularly telepathically communicated.

[75] Hancock (2007), 142-44.

[76] Turner, Victor (1969) 116–17, quoted in Hansen, George P. The Trickster and the Paranormal, Xlibris Corp, 2001, 86.

[77] See the work of Budd Hopkins, David Jacobs, John Mack, Karla Turner, Yvonne Smith, Richard Boylan.

[78] See Hopkins (1987) 299-300; Strieber (1987), 216-22; Mack (1994), 23, 27; 116; Bullard (2010) (a psychosocial comparison with folklore), 197-200; Clark, Jerome, The UFO Encyclopedia: The Phenomenon from the Beginning, 2 Vols., Omnigraphics Inc., 1998, 6.

[79] See Harner, Michael. The Way of the Shaman, HarperOne, 1990, and Cave and Cosmos: Shamanic Encounters with Another Reality, North Atlantic, 2013.